Wednesday, July 31, 2013




July 31, 2013



How's Fishing?
Fishing varies day by day and person by person.  According to Uncle Jim, concentration is the key.  He suggests that  you watch your lure and ignore the fish.  The fish  are just teasing you.  When you see your lure disappear, set the hook.  It does take concentration, that's for sure.
So... you can see why there are some people having a harder time catching fish.  The water is running faster and higher than most years, and it is very clear.  Using a  heavier lure or a line that sinks are still good choices.
Most people who fish at Bennett are very aware of this, but remember to get fresh two pound line or at least a 6X tippet on your reel.  he line can spook the fish,

Despite all of that, there have been some very nice fish caught lately.  As explained at the pre-season meeting this Spring,  August is a time of year one can expect to see somewhat smaller fish.  I am looking forward to next years' fishing.  The new hatchery will have been in place for a whole year and I feel certain we will all be pleased with the results.



Water Conditions
All measurements are in cubic feet per second (CFS) with the exception of the Gage House reading.
Most Recent Instantaneous Value on July 30, 2013 is 214 CFS. We had quite a bit of rain lately, but since it has been so dry, it didn't affect the Spring too much.
Minimum was 81 in 1934
The 25th percentile is 113
The median is 130 and the mean is 139.
The 75th percentile is 158 and the max was 248 in 1938
The water level at the Gage House is 2.18, The color is a slight blue-green and very clear



Did you Know
Most of the people who fish at Bennett know Julie Caffee, if not by name, by face.  Sadly for us, we will be seeing less of her because she has decided to transfer to the Lebanon office of the Missouri Department of Conservation.   Julie has been working at Bennett Spring since February of 2000.  When she first began the job, she encountered skepticism about her ability to hold her own doing such a physically demanding job.  What they didn't know about her was that she had grown up working with her family on a Missouri cattle farm and, besides her intelligence and winning personality, the girl had what the old timers call 'grit'.  She had just graduated from college with a degree in Animal Science and was eager to use her skills.  Julie was ready for the challenge and soon proved herself.  In 2004 she was promoted to Assistant Hatchery Manager, the only woman ever to hold that position in Missouri.

When I asked her why she was changing jobs, she said she wanted to improve her quality of life.  An eight-to-five, five-days-a-week job sounded pretty appealing at three A.M. when you are scrubbing screens in a thunderstorm trying to make sure the fish are still alive the next morning.   I asked her what she would miss the most about the job - she unhesitatingly replied "the people!"  She explained that she rarely knew their names, but knew what they drove and where and when they fished.  She always enjoyed seeing them after the long winter and catching up a little bit on their lives.  And we will all miss her.  It was such a pleasure to run in to her when she was working.  She always had a minute to talk even when you knew she was super busy.  She did such a great job organizing the kid's fishing day.  She survived three hatchery renovations and two managers.  It was hard for her, I'm sure, to make the decision to walk away from a job she is so proud of, and the people she cares so much about. She knew when it was time to make a change and she had the courage to do it.  Best of luck in your new job, Julie.



What's Working
Marabou :Black & Yellow, gingersnap, pink & white
Cracklebacks: green with grizzly hackle.  Griffith's Gnat
mini jigs: Bedspread, brown roach, john deere
 Glo balls - Easter Egg or original  tri-color,  hatchery brown Glo balls
 Rooster Tails - tinsel rainbow fly, yellow dot
Brown skipping woolie
ginger woolie bugger
Zone 2
Rebel Cricket Hopper
Zone 3 - orange is still the color!
Power Bait - orange or yellow sparkle
trout nuggets orange
River Fishing
white & pink Mouse Tails
orange worms, orange dough bait.
Salmon Peach dough bait

Lunker Club



7-26-13
Chase Cole (age 13) from Festus MO
2 pounds on a white marabou in zone 1

7-28-13

Mike Winkler from St. James, MO
2 pounds on an olive crackleback in zone 1

Nick Odum from Lebanon, MO
j2 pounds on a black woolie in zone 2

7-29-13
Joe Collins from Olathe KS
2 pounds on a Joe's fly in zone 1

Justin Peterson from Maryville IL
3-1/2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 1

7-30
Jeff Harres from New Berlin IL
2-1/2 pounds on a white glo ball in zone 1



Weather Forecast
Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 89. Heat index values as high as 93. Calm wind becoming east around 6 mph.
Friday: Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 1pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 89. South wind 7 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible. .
Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 86.
Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83.
Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 90.
Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 86.



Fishing Times
Regular Season for Trout Fishing at Bennett Spring is March 1st to October 31.

          August: 7:00 to 8:00
          September: 7:30 to 7:15
          October: 7:30 to 6:30

Catch-and- release season is the second Friday in November through the 2nd Monday in February. Times for catch-and-release are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday only.



Community Calendar

The 45th Annual Brumley Gospel Sing Scheduled for Jul. 31 - Aug. 3rd!

August 6 & 7 Moss Cutting

September 17 & 18 Moss Cutting

October 12 & 13 Holland Derby

October 31 end of Regular Season

November 8 Catch and Release Season begin



Quote of the Week

We who go a-fishing are a peculiar people. Like other men and women in many respects, we are like one another, and like no others, in other respects. We understand each other's thoughts by an intuition of which we know nothing. We cast our flies on many waters, where memories and fancies and facts rise, and we take them and show them to each other, and small or large, we are content with our catch.
Author:  W. C. Prime
Published:  I Go A-Fishing 1873

Thanks for reading!  Lucy

Wednesday, July 24, 2013


July 25, 2013




How's Fishing/

Fishing on the weekends continues to be great.  During the week there
seems to be more anglers struggling for fish.  Not all, of course, and
I really don't have a good idea of the reason for those that are
(although I do hear opinions from almost everyone, and they are rarely
the same.)   Even during the week there are groups of families and
friends enjoying each others' company and they still have stringers of
fish with enough for fish fries in the evenings.
 We are looking forward to the cool down this week.  It been a golden
summer.  The temperatures have been moderate and we have had just
enough rain to discourage wild fires.  Snow in May?  I've already
forgotten it.


Water Conditions
All measurements are in cubic feet per second (CFS) with the exception
of the Gage House reading.
Most Recent Instantaneous Value on July 23, 2013 is 204 CFS. There was
a little blip in the levels on Saturday and Sunday, but the water is
back down to more normal levels and visually clearer.
Minimum was 78 in 1934
The 25th percentile is 110
The median is 130 and the mean is 139.
The 75th percentile is 157 and the max was 266 in 1995 The water level
at the Gage House is 2.18,  The color is a slight blue-green and it's
not murky.


What's Working?

Marabou :Black & Yellow, gingersnap, pink & white, creamsicle (shell and white)
Cracklebacks: blue holographic, green,  grizzly pearl
Zebra Midge Copper John fly, pheasant tail nymph
White Floss jig, John deere jig Glo balls - #4 tri-color, white, hatchery brown
Glo balls - cheese with red dot, all of the tri-colors
rooster tails - tinsel rainbow fly, White with red tip

Zone 2
Gold Super Duper with red tip, frog Super Duper

Zone 3
Power Bait - orange trout nuggetsornage and white Mouse Tails
orange worms, orange dough bait.
Gulp florescent orange or white salmon eggs

Did You Know?



How To Choose the Right Fly Line Weight
BY LEFTY KREH
Let me begin by saying that rod manufacturers design rods for the
average person to use under average conditions. So unfortunately, most
fly fishermen use only one weight of line on their favorite rod.

Written on the rod blank or handle is a code number which indicates
the line that the rod manufacturer suggests is best for most
customers; i.e., 6 line. To most fly anglers, this means that they
should use nothing but a 6 weight line with this rod. But to get the
full potential from different fishing situations, you may want to
consider using several line sizes on your rod — perhaps varying as
much as two line sizes from the one suggested on the rod.

Manufacturers know your rod may be used in a host of fishing
situations, but they can’t judge your casting style and fishing
skills. So when they place a recommended line number on your rod, it
is implied that it’s for average fishing conditions. First, understand
that you’re not going to damage a fly rod using fly line a little
lighter or heavier than is recommended. Certainly, at times, the rod
will fish better if different line sizes are used.

Match line weight to conditions
Let me cite several examples of when you might want to use various
line weights on the same rod for different fishing conditions you may
encounter.

First, if you fish a swift, tumbling mountain brook, you can use a
rather short leader with a dry fly. A leader of 7-1/2 feet in length
would probably do the best job. But if you fish for trout with the
same outfit and dry fly on a calm spring creek, beaver pond or quiet
lake, that short leader could prevent you from catching many fish.
While many fishermen automatically know that on calmer water they have
to use longer leaders, many of them don’t really probe any deeper into
"why" they need a longer leader.

It isn’t the leader’s length that’s so important. In calm water, what
frightens the trout is the line falling to the surface. The longer the
leader, the farther away from the fly is the splashdown of the line.

But with a longer leader, the more difficult it is to cast and there
is a reduction in accuracy. Thus, a 9-foot leader is more accurate and
easier to turn over than a 15-footer. Considering this, plus the fact
that the splashdown of the line is what is frightening the trout,
there is a simple solution. Use a fly line one size lighter than the
rod manufacturer recommends. Jim Green, who has designed fly rods for
years and is a superb angler, mentioned to me more than three decades
ago that he almost always used a line one size lighter when fishing
dry flies where the trout were spooky or the water was calm. I tried
it and have routinely followed his advice. So, for example, if you are
using a six weight rod, you can drop down to a five weight line with
no problem. In fact, in very delicate fishing conditions, I often drop
down two sizes in line weights. There is a reason.

Weight and speed need to vary
Fly rods are designed to cast a particular weight of line — with a
good bit of line speed. If you drop down a line size, you benefit in
two ways. One, the line is going to alight on the water softer than a
heavier line. Two, because it is not as heavy, it doesn’t develop as
much line speed. A line traveling at high speed often comes to the
water with a heavier impact than one that is moving slower. Even with
a line two sizes lighter, you can still cast a dry fly or nymph far
more distance than what is called for in delicate trout fishing
situations. So you don’t hamper yourself at all by using a line
lighter than the rod suggests. Best of all, you can now use a shorter
leader, since impact on the surface has been lessened.

There is a second situation where a lighter than normal line will help
you if you are a fairly good caster. The wind is blowing and you need
to reach out to a distant target. Many try to solve this common
problem by using a line one size heavier. The usual thinking is that a
heavier line allows them to throw more weight and, they hope, get more
distance. Actually, going to a heavier line means that they complicate
the problem.

On a cast, the line unrolls toward the target in a loop form. The
larger the loop, the more energy is thrown in a direction that is not
at the target. When fishermen overload a fly rod with a line heavier
than the manufacturer calls for, they cause the rod to flex more
deeply, which creates larger loops on longer casts. Overloading the
rod wastes casting energy by not directing it at the target.

If you switch to a lighter line, you may not have enough weight
outside the rod tip to cause the rod to load or flex properly — if you
hold the normal amount of line outside the rod during casting. But if
you extend this lighter line about 10 feet or a little more outside
the rod than you normally would for this cast under calm conditions,
you can cast a greater distance into the wind. By extending the
additional amount of lighter line outside the rod, you cause it to
flex as if you were false casting the normal length of the recommended
line size.

Since the rod is now flexing properly, it will deliver tight loops,
but the lighter line is thinner. This means that there will be less
air resistance encountered on the cast.

If you are forced to cast a longer distance into the wind, switch to
one size lighter line and extend a little more line outside the rod
tip than you normally would. This means, of course, that you need to
be able to handle a longer line during false casting. But the line
that is lighter than the rod calls for will let you cast farther into
the breeze.

Heavier line is often necessary
There are situations where using a line heavier than the rod calls for
will also aid in casting and catching fish, such as when fishing small
streams for trout. Where pools are short and casts are restricted in
distance, a heavier line can be just the right answer. For example, on
many brook trout streams, the pool may be only 10 or 15 feet long and
you are forced to use a leader that is at least 7-1/2 feet long. That
means that only a few feet of your fly line — the weight that loads or
flexes the rod — is outside the rod tip. When fishing where distance
is very short and only a few feet of fly line are outside the rod tip,
it is important to switch to a line that is heavier. For example, if
you were using a rod designed for a four-weight line and had to cast
most of the time at targets less than 20 feet, placing a five- or even
a six-weight line on the rod would let you load the rod, and casting
would be much easier.

This same principle applies when you are bass fishing in the southern
swamps. Often, you are casting in small, winding creeks, or where
there is a lot of brush immediately behind you. This also holds true
when fishing the backcountry of Florida for snook, where you are close
to the target and backcast area is limited. If you are using a rod
designed to throw an eight-weight line and you’re fishing at 30 to 40
feet from the target area and the backcast area is less than that, a
nine-weight line will permit you to cast much better because the
heavier line will load up the rod and let it flex.

Heavily weighted lines, like the Wet Cel III or Uniform Sink +, can
and should often be used in one to two sizes heavier than the rod
calls for because, for some reason, a line one size heavier seems to
improve distance casting. Try one and you’ll see what I mean.

Use shooting TAPERS for greater distance
Finally, consider shooting tapers (also called "heads"), which are
generally used to obtain greater distance. When casting with normal
line, if you cast well, you never hold just 30 feet of line outside
the rod tip to get distance. Instead, you false cast with considerably
more than 30 feet of line outside. When using a shooting head, try
using one that’s a size heavier than you usually do and you’ll be
pleasantly surprised at the distance you gain.

So don’t limit yourself to the standard guidelines given by rod
manufacturers. Experiment with different line weights for special
fishing conditions. You will be pleased with the results.



What's Working?


Marabou: :Black & Yellow, gingersnap, pink & white, creamsicle (shell and white)
Cracklebacks: blue holographic, green,  grizzly pearl
Zebra Midge,  Copper John fly, pheasant tail nymph
White Floss jig, John deere jig
Glo balls - cheese with red dot, ALL of the tri-colors
rooster tails - tinsel rainbow fly, white with red tip, hatchery brown
Rooster Tails,

Zone 2
Gold Super Duper with red tip, frog super duper

Zone 3 - orange is the color!
Power Bait - orange trout nuggets, orange and white Mouse Tails
orange worms, orange dough bait.
Gulp florescent orange or white salmon eggs

Lunker Club
7-17-13
Julian Schmiedeke from Sedalia, MO
2 pounds in the Niangua River on natural power bait

7-18-13
Cody Tumlin from Ozark, MO
2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

7-20-13
Donnie Mount from Clinton MO
2-1/4 pounds on a pink & white jig in zone 1

7-23-13
Sarah Miles from Mount Moriah, MO (age 9)
2-1/4 pounds on a white roach in zone 1


Fishing Times

Regular Season for Trout Fishing at Bennett Spring is March 1st to October 31.

          July: 6:30 to 8:30
          August: 7:00 to 8:00
          September: 7:30 to 7:15
          October: 7:30 to 6:30
Catch-and- release season is the second Friday in November through the
2nd Monday in February. Times for catch-and-release are 8:00 am to
4:00 pm Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday only.


Community Calendar

The 45th Annual Brumley Gospel Sing Scheduled for Jul. 31 - Aug. 3rd!

August 6 & 7 Moss Cutting

September 17 & 18 Moss Cutting

October 12 & 13 Holland Derby

October 31 end of Regular Season

November 8 Catch and Release Season begin


Weather Forecast

Thursday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 85. Southeast wind 5 to 9 mph.

Friday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly
cloudy, with a high near 77. Southeast wind 8 to 11 mph.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 81.

Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 83.

Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 84

Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a
high near 87.

Nick 
Quote of the Week (another tidbit from Lefty Kreh)

Allowing the fly to sink to the fish's level, the angler makes a
retrieve. The fly comes directly at the fish, which suddenly sees its
approach. As the small fly get nearer, the fish moves forward to
strike, but the tiny fly doesn't flee at the sight of the predator.
Instead it continues to come directly toward the fish. Suddenly the
fish realizes intuitively that something is wrong(its never happened
before), so it flees until it can assess the situation. An opportunity
for the angler has been lost.
Author:  Lefty Kreh
Published:  Advanced Fly Fishing Techniques

Thanks for reading!  Lucy

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

July 17, 2013



How's Fishing?

Fishing continues to be really good.  The stringers we are seeing are
substantial. Very few anglers, even those with less experience, are
complaining about not catching fish or about the fish size.  The water
level is very close to normal but the flow is greater than it has been
in previous years. The stream is very clear with the familiar
blue-green cast.  The moss has finally been cut and the weather
forecast is for warm sunny days with only the occasional pop-up
shower.  Hard to believe that summer is more than half over.  We look
forward to seeing you!


Did You Know

Best Fluorocarbon Fishing Line
Posted on June 6, 2013 by Mark Thompson
Before we consider what is the best fluorocarbon fishing line let us
discuss the properties and characteristics of this leader material.

When it comes to fly fishing the introduction of fluorocarbon may be
one of the most outstanding developments since the creation of fly
fishing itself. I joke, but it really has made a large difference to
fly fishing catch rates and fun to be had by anglers of all ages and
skill level.

Fluorocarbon has many properties but the one that makes it ideal for
fishing is that light refracts through it the same way as water and so
the fish (or so it is believed) can’t see it. This is especially
evident in still water fisheries as trout are usually leader shy and
will move away from traditional mono filament lines. This is were the
fluorocarbon has helped get extra takes.

In river fishing especially fast water the light passing through it is
refracted and distorted in numerous ways and the trout can’t see you
or the line as easily as in calm still water so it is not that
important but the other benefits make it ideal in these conditions
also.



A tendency to be brittle!

Some fluorocarbon lines are very brittle but his can be compensated by
getting the diameter that is correct for your type of fishing. There
are many brands and breaking strains so it may be a bit of testing to
see what is ideally suited but we will discuss that later.

Fluorocarbon is usually a lot stiffer than mono and is great for
turnover on casts which helps in reduction of wind knots, tangles and
bad casting. This makes it good for a beginner who is trying to learn
and also very good on weighted flies that have a tendency to drop on
the forward cast and catch the loop.

There is usually a lack of stretch in fluorocarbon at least it
stretches a lot less than mono and so keeps you in better contact with
your fly or lure. This also helps set the hook quicker when a takes
comes.
The one draw back is you can be broken easily if a trout takes hard
while you are pulling especially on smaller breaking strengths so its
important to be careful as the line gets closer to you during the
retrieve. However with fluorocarbon the fact that it is virtually
invisible in water you can get away with using slightly stronger and
thicker strengths so snap offs can be reduced. This all depends of
course on the size of fly you are using as a twelve pound line will
not go through the smallest of hook sizes.

Does It sink without applying sink-it ?

Fluorocarbon sinks in water and is good to get weighted flies down to
the bottom of a lake quickly. It is also great on dry flies when using
smaller diameters as the leader sinks without applying sink-it while
the fly floats which is the desired effect. Some anglers prefer mono
in this case as it will not pull the dry fly under without constant
re-application of float-ant.

Fluorocarbon is very tough and abrasive resistant when scrapping off
rocks or underwater hazards which makes it ideal for fishing rivers
and lakes. If by chance the line gets kinked on anything a rub with a
cloth or piece of leather will usually get the kink out. Another good
reason to use it. With mono you would end up having to tie or change
to a new leader.

How do you make fluorocarbon leaders?

Making a leader with fluorocarbon is similar to mono apart from the
fact that the material is slightly more slippery and because of such
knots need to be well secured. Some anglers put on a spot of angling
glue to the knot for this although a good idea I don’t feel it is
necessary if you use the correct knots and tie them well.

As with all knots lubrication is even more crucial to fluorocarbon to
avoid burn and weakening of the knot. I use water or surgeons knots
for droppers and putting a loop on the end ready for tightening to the
fly line by loop to loop. When tying on the flies I use blood knots
with the end tucked in leaving the tag slightly longer than when using
mono for slippage.

Fluorocarbon leader length!

Leader length is down to the type of fishing, the where and the when,
but ideally you want the leader to be the same length of the rod or in
some cases slightly longer. So for a trout rod of ten feet you would
be looking for a combined length of nine to ten feet of leader and
tippet. If dry fly fishing you can extend this out to about fourteen
or fifteen feet but you will need to taper it down a few times to get
the proper turnover.

This can be a process of trial and error to see what length you can
cast properly with the conditions you are fishing. For instance if it
is particularly a windy day a long leader will become tangled very
quickly and it would be better to fish one fly on a shorter leader
maybe seven to eight feet that try to proceed with a longer one and
spend a lot of time fixing wind knots and tangles.

Written by Mark Thompson
To see the full article, go to http://howtotroutfish.org/


What's Working

Zone 1
Marabou :Black & Yellow, gingersnap, pink & white,
 Cracklebacks: blue holographic, chartreuse grizzly,
Copper John fly
pheasant tail nymph
 White Floss jig, John deere jig
Glo balls -  #4 tri-color, white, hatchery brown
 Rooster Tails - tinsel rainbow fly, whtie with red tip, white blade

 Zone 2
Gold Super Duper with red tip, frog super duper, gold kastmaster.

Zone 3

Power Bait - white extra scent power bait
orange trout nuggets
regular scent rainbow Trout Magnet,
 Pink & White Mouse Tails
power bait flatworm, natural.



Lunker Club

7-10-13
Trace Thompson from Glasogow MO (age 13)
2-1/8th pounds on a white marabou in zone 2

7-11-13
Fred Hangartner from St. Joe, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou

Eldora Yoder from Versailles MO
2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

Tad Headrick from Salem, MO
3 pounds 9 ounces on brown bait in zone 3

7-12-13

Andrew Bridges from Marshall, MO
2 pounds on white power bait in zone 3

Justin Molitor from Foristell MO
2-1/8 pounds on a pink & white marabou in zone 2

7-13-13
Jesse Brelsford from Lathrop MO
2 pounds on a cheese worm in zone 3

7-14-13
Kyle Renfro from Tipton, MO
2-3/4 pounds on a bedspread in zone 1

7-16-13
Norman Black from Edgar Springs, MO
10 pounds on a sculpin fly in zone 2



Fishing Times

Regular Season for Trout Fishing at Bennett Spring is March 1st to October 31.

          July: 6:30 to 8:30
          August: 7:00 to 8:00
          September: 7:30 to 7:15
          October: 7:30 to 6:30


Catch-and- release season is the second Friday in November through the
2nd Monday in February. Times for catch-and-release are 8:00 am to
4:00 pm Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday only.



Water Conditions

All measurements are in cubic feet per second (CFS) with the exception
of the Gage House reading.

Most Recent Instantaneous Value on July 16, 2013 is 204 CFS. The rate
it is flowing is a bit high for this time of year.

Minimum was 78 in 1934

The 25th percentile is 114,
The median is 136 and the mean is 149.
 The 75th percentile is 169 and the max was 204 in 1995
The water level at the Gage House is 2.18, This is again slightly
lower than the previous week
The color is good, getting closer to that amazing gin-clear of late summer every day.



Calendar of Events

July 18 & 19th Bennett Spring Church of God is hosting a Vacation
Bible School. All are welcome.  Call 417 532-7531 for more
information.

The 45th Annual Brumley Gospel Sing Scheduled for Jul. 31 - Aug. 3rd!

August 6 & 7 Moss Cutting

September 17 & 18 Moss Cutting

October 12 & 13 Holland Derby

October 31 end of Regular Season

November 8 Catch and Release Season begin



Weather Forecast

Thursday: Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 93. Heat index values
as high as 98. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph.
Friday: Sunny and hot, with a high near 95.
Saturday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a
high near 90.
Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 87.
Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 89.
Tuesday: Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 92.


Quote of the week

There should be little doubt as to the finest trout stream. It flows
through paper birches and fern; through lodgepole pines and sagebrush;
through the sounds of the drumming grouse and smells of a tamarack
swamp. You drive there after work; you fly there every summer. It is
where you caught your first trout, it's where your children will catch
theirs. It is your stream, and it's the best trout stream in America.

Author::  Lawrence Sheehan

thanks for reading.  Lucy