Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Trout Fishing Report for Bennett Spring
Brought to you by
Weaver's Tackle Store

September 20, 2016



How's Fishing?

The rain came, the water rose, fishing was great!  The Niangua rose a
great deal more than the Spring, both were up and running fast.  The
Spring branch stayed surprisingly clear and there were even reports of
top water action this weekend.  Dave's Hopper, Madam x, and even
renegades were all working at certain times.  In general, fishing
deeper and with heavier lures worked more consistently.  You could put
almost anything brown on the end of your line and have success.  Brown
marabou, brown woolies with or without spinners, brown RGN's, and if
it had just a bit of flash to it, it worked even better.   Even the
brown power bait was good for zone three.


Fishing Times
September        7:30 a.m.   -   7:15 p.m.
October            7:30 a.m.   -   6:30 p.m.


Water Conditions

For Bennett Spring
9-11-16
Gage house level is 1.95 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second minimum was 68 in 1937
 25th percentile is 97
 Median is 111
 Mean is 131
 75th percentile is 143
 current level is 279
 Max was 389 in 2008


Niangua River  -  The river rose, briefly, to eight feet on September 17th.
9-18-16
Gage House reading (water level) is 2.52 feet Discharge levels in
cubic feet per second:
Minimum was 25 in 1995
25th percentile is 38
Median is 51
Mean is 118
75th percentile is 158
Previous record high max was 700 in 1993
 Today's reading is 530

What's Working?

From the Fly Case:

Adams - dry fly
RGN dark brown
white mega worm
zebra midge, red or black
black zonker
Chamois worm

Zone 1 & 2

Red brassie
Marabou: Shell & brown, yellow
Possum Hair Roach
Glo Balls: yellow, jimi hendrix, easter egg, original tricolor, salmon
with red dot, hatchery brown
 john deere mini jig
 peach fur bugs
wooly worm, brown
wooly bugger, sculpin olive

Zone 3
Brown power bait worm
Power Bait: Salmon Peach, White, or Brown


Lunker Club

9-16-16
Don Denner from Hannibal, MO
2-1/8 pounds on salmon peach power bait in zone 3

9-17-16

George Clark from Wentzville, MO
2-1/2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 1

John Greer from Sweet Springs, Mo
2-1/2 pounds on a chamois worm


Of Interest

A bit about Fly Fishing,  With permission, I am reprinting a blog
written by Walt Fulps of MissouriTroutHunter.com

All fishing is enjoyable, but catching a trout on an artificial fly is
one of the most rewarding and exciting experiences one can imagine.
Those that appreciate fly fishing in its purest sense are the same
sort of folks that prefer bowhunting to rifle hunting, backpacking to
pay-site camping, and wilderness areas to state parks. This doesn't
mean that a fly fisherman never rifle hunts, camps at a pay site, or
visits a state park. It's just that their hearts usually lie
elsewhere. If you are one of those people that enjoy the journey more
than the destination, then you should give fly fishing a try.

For the fly fishing purist, the act is more of a religious experience
than a hobby. And while we're fly fishing, there is a sense of
following in some great historical person's footsteps, reliving
someone else's notable experience, a feeling of being tied into
something more significant than just trying to catch a fish. And these
nondescript feelings are actually amplified when we fish in utter
isolation. It's the sense that we're actually doing something truly
breathtaking. However, if you define a successful day of fishing as a
day when you can fill your freezer, then perhaps fly fishing is not
for you. There's no right or wrong in it, it's just a matter of
preference. Fly fishing is not for everyone.

Many people don't realize that fly fishing in some form has existed
for thousands of years. An ancient Roman historian by the name of
Claudius Aelianus, who made his reputation as a military writer (think
"war correspondent" for the Roman army), documented fly fishing by the
Macedonians more than 1800 years ago in the following manner:

"They do not use flies for bait, for if a man's hand touch them they
lose their natural color, their wings wither, and they become unfit
food for the fish. Instead, they fasten crimson wool around a hook and
fix on to the wool two feathers that grow under a cock's wattles and
which in color are like wax. Their rods are six feet long, and their
line is the same length. Then they throw their snare, and the fish,
attracted and maddened by the color, comes straight at it, thinking
from the lovely sight to gain a dainty mouthful. However, when it
opens its jaws, it is caught by the hook and enjoys a bitter repast as
a captive."

Is that cool, or what? Of course, no can be certain, but it also
appears as if they were actually trout fishermen. Claudius Aelianus
described the fish as having a "spotted exterior", and he identified
the river in question as the Astracus River, which holds brown trout
to this day.
Picture
Fast forward 1890 years or so. Fly fishing is somewhat popular, but
not yet considered terribly romantic. And then... THE MOVIE is
released, and all hell breaks loose. Once the "girlfriends" started
swooning over Norman and Paul Maclean and their Montana fly fishing
adventures, the "boyfriends" started buying new equipment, running out
to the rivers to slap the water with their El Cheapo brand plastic
flyline. Of course, it didn't help that Brad Pitt was in the movie.
For all we know, the real Norman and Paul could have been butt ugly,
but noooo, they had to cast Brad Pitt!

A River Runs Through It (the movie more so than the book), did a
spectacular job of explaining the allure of fly fishing to those who
knew nothing about it. Without clouding the action with words, the
movie made it very clear what the fisherman was seeing, thinking and
feeling, and the rationale behind the problem-solving and
decision-making was all communicated by facial expressions and pause.
It somehow managed to explain to many exactly why folks like us are
obsessed. Many thousands of non-fishing spouses exclaimed, "Oh! Now I
get it!" And to us obsessed fly-fishermen, this was a beautiful sound.

The movie really helped the sport. Our trout streams are now more
likely than ever to be protected by our legislatures, because there
are now many more voices screaming for just that very thing. And, it
forces us old-timer fly fishermen to seek out more secluded, wild and
challenging waters to avoid the crowds of newbies. And our wives now
think we're just a little bit more like Brad Pitt. All in all, it's a
win-win situation. Thank you Robert Redford.
Want to try your hand at fly fishing? Other than enrolling in one of
my fly fishing classes or booking some private lessons, here's what
you need to get started. Start with an inexpensive graphite fly rod
and a simple fly reel. If you look around, you can probably find a
painfully cheap fiberglass flyrod combo hanging on a peg in a big box
store for less than $75, and that's not a bad idea if you're buying a
rod just out of curiosity. If you are seriously interested, though,
you should try something a bit higher in the quality department.
Regardless of where you purchase your first outfit, expect most combos
to have nylon backing and some ordinary fly line included -- the
backing is tied to the reel, and the fly line is tied to the backing.

You'll also need to buy some leader material, which can actually be
pretty confusing. Your fly line is big, bulky and easily seen by fish.
The leader, which is simply specialized fishing line, attaches to the
end of the fly line by way of a prefabricated loop, an inserted metal
eyelet, or a simple nail knot (not that a nail knot is simple). Your
leader should taper down in down size with the thickest portion (the
butt end) attaching to the fly line and the thinnest portion attaching
to the fly.

If you're fishing most Missouri waters, you can get by with a 7-1/2
foot tapered leader in size 4x. For more challenging waters or more
difficult fish, you'll want to use a longer leader -- it's your first
weapon against edgier fish. Onto the end of the leader, you'll attach
an additional length of line in 5x using a triple surgeon's knot, a
blood knot, or nested clinch knots. This additional line you add to
your leader is called your "tippet."

The purpose of tapering your leader is three-fold. First, it allows
for the fly to roll over properly when you cast. Second, it helps your
fly tumble naturally in the current like a real bug. Third, if a fish
(or tree) breaks your line, it will break at the weakest point,
meaning it will break closer to your fly, thus saving most of your
leader. The smaller the fly you're using, the smaller your tippet
should be. A 5x tippet will work fine casting flies size 8 through 16,
but with a 7x tippet, you can fish flies down to a size 24 or so. If
you're fishing a fly smaller than a #24 in Missouri waters, you're
just making your life too difficult.

This brings us to the fly, of course. There's a favorite debate that
fly fishermen apparently enjoy. If you could only have "x" number of
flies, what would you keep in your box? Well, if I didn't know where I
was going to fish in Missouri, and I could only carry 10 fly patterns,
here is what I'd take:

Adams dry fly #12-22
Elk Hair Caddis dry fly #14-20
Pheasant Tail nymph #14-18
Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear nymph #10-16
Stonefly nymphs 8-16 (various colors)
Wooly Bugger  #6-12 (various colors)
Scud #12-18 (various colors)
Dave's Hopper #8-12
Glo-bug wet flies #10-14 (various colors)
Soft Hackle wets #12-18 (various colors)

If you're an avid fly-fisher, some of your favorite patterns are
certainly not listed here, but a box stocked with this menu of flies
will catch you fish on pretty much any Missouri trout stream.

Aside from these basic requirements, you'll, of course, need some
additional equipment and accessories. You'll need a decent pair of
waders, a vest, some fly boxes, some polarized sunglasses, and perhaps
a landing net. Big box stores in trout country should have these items
in stock, but if you seek out an actual fly shop, you'll get some
extra perks for giving them your business. Aside from free tips and
advice, many offer fly tying lessons and casting lessons free or
cheap. Not to mention, they need your support! There's an old fly shop
joke: If you want to be a millionaire fly shop owner, start with two
million dollars.


Weather Forecast

Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 88.

Friday: Sunny, with a high near 87. South wind 5 to 7 mph.

Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 86.

Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a
high near 80.

Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a
high near 74..

Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a
high near 74.

Calendar of Events

The Nature Center Programs are Saturdays (Exception-No programs on October 22nd)

9 a.m. – Guided Hike on the Spring Trail (2/3 mile).  The hike will start at the nature center.  Bring Water!  Directly afterward we will participate in the cultural tradition of raising the American and Missouri flags.  Symbols on the Missouri flag will be discussed.  Once inside the nature center, watch the indoor aquarium fish being fed.

11 a.m. – Ms. Patty Storytime with Activity near the picnic and playground area diagonally across from the                  park store.

2 p.m. – Family Program and Movie in the Nature Center Classroom followed by games to be played                         outdoors!

               • Owls-The Night Shift (October 1st)

               • Why Bats Matter (October 8th,15th, 29th)


October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017

Quote of the Week
I make it a rule never to weigh or measure a fish I've caught, but simply to estimate its dimensions as accurately as possible, and then, when telling about it, to improve these figures by roughly a fifth, or twenty percent. I do this mainly because most people believe all fishermen exaggerate by at least twenty percent, and so I allow for
the discounting my audience is almost certain to apply.
Author:  Ed Zern
Published:  Are Fishermen really Liars? (1977)



Thanks for reading.
Lucy

Monday, September 12, 2016

Trout Fishing Report for Bennett Spring
Brought to you by
Weaver's Tackle Store

September 13, 2016


How's Fishing?
The following is an e-mail from Ben Havens,who is the Hatchery Manager:

Hello-

Another month has passed as we slowly work our way to the end of the trout season..

As of the first of September, spring flow is at 145cfs or 93mgd…. Avg. for this time of year is 127cfs.

The water has been brown and dingy almost all last month and we have had two “floods”, both of which brought our water temp up to 74 degrees. Not ideal for our fish, but we slid by and things have drastically improved. Now if we could just get rid of that brown algae…..

We have received over 8” of rain here at the hatchery this month. The majority of rain falling on Thursdays/Fridays.. These factors have undoubtedly brought our August tag sales down a bit, the first month all season that we didn’t have an increase… In fact, all the MDC hatcheries have experienced a decline in tag sales this August as compared to 2015. I’m happy to say that Bennett declined the smallest amount of the parks, down just 10%. Overall, our season total numbers remain up and are the best since the 2010 season.

This season’s average stocking size of trout continues to be good. So far we have averaged 12.75” from March – August. Stocking size will remain steady for the remainder of the season.

I heard some rumors have been flying around between the fishermen that we aren’t going to really do any work on the stream this off season…. I feel actions speak louder than words, and those skeptical folks will soon have to find something else to talk about…Preparations have been made and plans are still in place for gravel removal work (specifically in Zone 1)  to begin as soon as the season closes. I appreciate everyone’s patience.

Hopefully this coming month will bring us fair weather and tight lines for many anglers!

Call me with questions, or stop by, my office door is always open.

Have a great month!
-BH

Tag Sales for August

                                  Adult          Kids          Total
August     2016        14637          2551          17188
August     2015        16118          3063          19181

Tag Sales for the year are up 5.97%

2016        10,5856
2015         99,888

Ben Havens
Hatchery Manager
Bennett Spring Fish Hatchery
26142 Hwy 64A
Lebanon, Mo 65536
417-532-4418 x1062



Fishing Times

September     7:30 a.m.        -   7:15 p.m.

October         7:30 a.m.        -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions

For Bennett Spring
9-11-16
Gage house level is 1.95 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 70 in 1936
25th percentile is 96
 Median is 119
 Mean is 122
 75th percentile is 144
 current level is 128
Max was 223 in 1994

Niangua River
9-11-16
Gage House reading (water level) is 2.52 feet Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

Minimum was 32 in 1995
25th percentile is 117
Median is 132
Mean is 165
75th percentile is 228
Previous record high max was 311 in 2013
Today's reading is 426



What's Working

From the Fly Case:

Renegade 16 & 18.
RGN light olive, rust or brown
red san juan worm
zebra midge, red or black
flashback midge
Chamois worm

Zone 1 & 2

Red brassie
Marabou: Shell & white, salmon,
Possum Hair Roach
Glo Balls: salmon with red dot, white, peach
john deere mini jig
peach fur bugs

Zone 3

Power Bait: Salmon Peach, White, or Brown



Lunker Club

8-24-16
Cindy Wallut from Deep Water, MO
2 pounds on a jig in zone 2



Of Interest

With permission, I am reprinting a blog written by Walt Fulps of MissouriTroutHunter.com.  Last week was rainbow trout basics, this week is the Brown.

About Brown Trout

The brown trout was first imported from Europe in the 1890's, according to many accounts. It was considered a good transplant for many areas, because it was able to tolerate water temperatures warmer than the smaller and slower-growing native brook trout. To this day, the brown trout is a very popular and sought-after fish. Part of the reason is that it is considered a more selective feeder, meaning it is a greater challenge to catch than its rainbow cousin. There are also fewer brown trout out there. The Missouri Department of Conservation raises between 1.5 and 2 million rainbow trout per year, but rarely more than 300,000 brown trout.

Yes, the brown trout feeds and behaves differently than the rainbow, but there is no study we're aware of that supports the supposition that browns are more selective. In fact, brown trout feed very much like rainbows until they reach about 12" in length and a pound in weight. Shortly thereafter, their diet begins to include more big stuff -- minnows, sculpins, crayfish, etc. -- and fewer bugs. This is simple nature. The reason? No one knows for sure, but there are a few theories which still need study. One is that they are simply more aggressive by nature. Another is that they need more protein per meal in order to meet their complex energy requirements. A third theory is more complicated, stating that browns may engage in seasonal gorging to bulk up on fat, thus allowing them to survive more dormant seasons like the coldest part of winter and the hottest part of summer. We'll leave the final decision to the biologists, but the result for fishermen is the same. Instead of picking at caddis larvae all day, a brownie will chase down a couple of sculpins or crayfish and be full for hours. They're not more selective -- they're just stuffed. They'll still bite, because they're opportunistic feeders, but you'll have to drift your bait to them just right. If they've recently fed, they certainly won't chase your fly or lure, unless it looks big and meaty and appears to be an exceptionally easy target.

Brown trout spawn in the fall and begin to gorge themselves prior to spawning. This pre-spawn buffet period generally begins in October and can stretch into mid-November. It is during this period that true brown trout trophy hunters come out. And since brown trout also tend to be a lot more active at night than rainbows, those trophy hunters will often try their hand casting a big streamer or small crankbait at night in search of that 30+ pound monster hiding out there somewhere. The world record brown trout was caught in Arkansas and weighed roughly 40 pounds. Missouri will break that record eventually.



Weather Forecast

Wednesday: Partly sunny, with a high near 82..

Thursday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 81.

Friday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Cloudy, with a high near 78.

Saturday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 78.

Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 76.

Calendar of Events

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

Fish are, of course, indispensable to the angler. They give him an excuse for fishing and justify the fly rod without which he would be a mere vagrant. But the average fisherman's average catch doesn't even begin to justify, as fish, its cost in work, time, and money. The true worth of fishing, as the experienced, sophisticated angler comes to realize, lies in the memorable contacts with people and other living creatures, scenes and places, and living waters great and small which it provides

Author:
Sparse Grey Hackle (Alfred W. Miller)



Thanks for reading,
Lucy

Monday, September 5, 2016

September 6, 2016



How's Fishing?

As you can see from the pictures, this Labor Day Weekend was a very busy one here at Bennett.   People enjoyed the amazingly good weather,  the camaraderie, and the chance to wet a line with their friends and families.
Water conditions haven't changed appreciably the last six weeks.  The stream still has quite a bit of color and is higher than is expected for this time of year.
There hasn't been many lunkers caught this week, but neither has there been a lot of 'frowny faces'  (That means that the fishing has been good).  The classic lures are working.  John Deere, black & yellow marabou, brassies, scuds and san juan worms.  They are all good.
As we  head into the fall spawning period, peach is coming forward as a dominant color.  In zone one and two, the peach fur bugs, glo balls, and salmon marabou are good choices. Peach plastic worms or salmon peach power bait will work if you are in zone three.  It seems that a trout will always eat an egg!


Fishing Times

September       7:30 a.m.        -   7:15 p.m.

October           7:30 a.m.        -   6:30 p.m.

Water Conditions

The water levels at Bennett Spring continue to be a little on the high
side and receding very slowly.  The clarity and levels continue to improve daily.

For Bennett Spring
8-28-16
Gage house level is 1.98 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
 minimum was 70 in 1936
 25th percentile is 98
 Median is 123
Mean is 133
 75th percentile is 146
 current level is 134
 Max was 391 in 2008

Niangua River
8-28-16
Gage House reading (water level) is 1.97 feet
 Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

Minimum was 20 in 1996
25th percentile is 32
Median is 58
Mean is 94
75th percentile is 80
Today's reading is 149
Max is 540 in 2010
Today's reading is 149


What's Working?

From the Fly Case:
Renegade 16 & 18.
Gray or white Scud
RGN light olive, rust or brown
red san juan worm
zebra midge, red or black
Chamois worm

Zone 1 & 2
Red brassie
Brown Wooly Bugger
Kapok
Marabou: Shell & white, salmon,
Possum Hair Roach
 Glo Balls: salmon, white
 john deere mini jig
peach fur bugs

Zone 3

Power Bait: Salmon Peach or Brown

Lunker Club

8-30-16

John Greer from Sweet Springs, MO
2-1/4 pounds on Chamois worm in zone 2

9-2-16

Jeff Grobe from Lenexa, KS
2+ pounds (Catch and release) on a gingersnap in zone 2

9-3-16

Barth Buchmann from St. Louis, MO
2.5 pounds on home tied lure

Russ Grobe from Hillsboro MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow Marabou in zone 1



Of Interest
With permission, I am reprinting a blog written by Walt Fulps of MissouriTroutHunter.com.  Next week - Browns!

What is a Trout?

It makes sense to start at the beginning, and the first question is obviously "what is a trout?" The trout found in Missouri are members of the salmonid family, and they act similar to salmon in many ways. We have two primary species available in Missouri: the rainbow trout and the brown trout. Over the years, I've heard the occasional rumor floated about some brook trout and even a few golden trout here and there. If this is true (not bloody likely), they're well-guarded in waters without public access, not to mention that the "golden trout" are most certainly "palomino trout," which is essentially a yellow and white rainbow trout -- NOT a true golden trout. All Missouri trout are restricted to cold water locations where the water temperature doesn't generally move much above 75 degrees, even in the hottest part of the summer. Since the Southern half of Missouri is so rich with springs, there are numerous cold water rivers and streams that are perfect for these fish.

The Rainbow Trout is by far the most numerous trout found here. They were first introduced in Missouri's cold water streams in the 1880's. In fact, some of the earliest stockings were accomplished by railroad workers who dumped buckets of small trout into the streams the trains crossed. Some of these original strains of trout continue to exist to this day. Although there are several wild rainbow populations that can be found throughout the state, most of the decent-sized rainbow trout you'll find are hatchery-raised. Hatchery trout spend 15 months or so eating about 1-1/4 pound of trout chow to grow to stockable size.
Rainbow trout, once they've lived wild for a while, will feed almost exclusively on aquatic insects (mayflies, caddis, midges, etc.), and terrestrial insects (ants, beetles, grasshopper, etc.). In some waters, the trout may feed largely on small crustaceans like scud (small freshwater shrimp) and sowbugs (aquatic "rolly pollies"). Once they reach about 17-18 inches in length, they may find it difficult to maintain their weight by bug-eating alone, and they'll start transitioning to a more pisciverous lifestyle, meaning they start hunting non-bug prey. In addition, larger rainbows will also tend toward scavenging behavior, roaming slack water picking up smelly bits of dead stuff. This gives them the great amount of protein they need to maintain their size while allowing them to conserve energy. It also offers them some protection from fisherman. Recently released hatchery fish, however, will bite on any number of items (i.e. corn, marshmallows, dough bait, etc.), mainly because they were raised on lumps of food thrown at them. After stocking, it will take a little time for them to experiment with natural food sources before they give up their preference for the hand-fed cafeteria style of feeding. It seems as though all trout, however, have some genetically imprinted desire to eat fish eggs. In virtually every trout stream, good old fashioned salmon eggs or an egg fly can work wonders when nothing else will.

After decades of trial and error, two primary strains of rainbow trout are now grown in our state-owned hatcheries and stocked in our state. These two strains are called the "Missouri Strain" and the "Missouri Arlee Strain". Yep, our state actually developed it's own strains. Cool, eh? The whole point of playing mother nature was to develop a strain of fish that grew quickly, was resistant to disease, and resilient to changing water conditions. The reason for two strains is to have a strain that will spawn in the autumn and another that will spawn in the springtime. This, of course, increases efficiency and yield from the hatcheries. All in all, they've devised a pretty neat system.



Weather Forecast

Wednesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 90. South wind 7 to 11 mph.

Thursday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Friday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 82.

Saturday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 77.

Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 81.



Calendar of Events

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week
The one great ingredient in successful fly-fishing is patience. The man whose fly is always on the water has the best chance. There is always a chance of a fish or two, no matter how hopeless it looks. You never know what may happen in fly-fishing.

Author:  Francis Francis, 1862

Thanks for reading.
Lucy


Tuesday, August 30, 2016

August 30, 2016



How's Fishing?

The season is winding down, one more big weekend for all of us to enjoy.
Top water fishing (I know a lot of people really like this type of
fishing the best) continues to improve despite the continuing
murkiness of the water.  Try your personal favorites, of course, or
perhaps a renegade.  Griffiths gnats and pale evening dun are also
good choices this time of year.  Scuds, tan or gray, and RGN's -
lighter colors - are doing well, too.
After Wednesday, rain has been taken out of the forecast and should
give the stream, as well as the river, a chance to recoup.

Fishing Times

September       7:30 a.m.        -   7:15 p.m.

October           7:30 a.m.        -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions

The water levels at Bennett Spring continue to be a little on the high
side and receding very slowly.  The Niangua has been more impacted by
the rains we have had locally.  It's high, but not excessively so.

For Bennett Spring
8-28-16
Gage house level is 2.03 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
 minimum was 68 in 1968
 25th percentile is 103
 Median is 128
Mean is 126 75th percentile is 143
 current level is 145
 Max was 202 in 1979

Niangua River
8-28-16
Gage House reading (water level) is 2.25 feet
 Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

Minimum was 19 in 1993
25th percentile is 23
Median is 33
Mean is 46
75th percentile is 67
Max is 117 in 2007
Today's reading is 199



What's Working

From the Fly Case:
Adam's Parachute, 14s and 16.
Walt's Worm
Gray Scud
RGN, golden, light olive or brown, rust
Pale Evening Dun, 14 or 16
flashback scuds
chamois

Zone 1 & 2

Mega Worm
Brown Wooly Bugger
Kapok
Marabou: Shell & white, salmon, Gingersnap, red & yellow
Possum Hair Roach
White floss jig Glo Balls: white with red dot, white,
 john deere mini jig
peach fur bugs

Zone 3

Power Bait: Salmon Peach or Brown
mouse tails, pink & white for Niangua
tan scented Power Bait Worms

Lunker Club
8-26-16
Jayne Mount from Clinton, MO
2.5 pounds on a hand tied pink & white

8-28-16
Luong Hink from Gardner, Kansas
2-1/4 pounds on a chamois worm.

Of Interest
Saturday the Missouri Fishing Community lost a Pioneer and the architect of the Trout Program in our state.  I found a nice article that I copied from the Mid Missouri Trout Unlimited Newsletter that was written by Jim Low.  He tells a bit about the man and his work in framing the programs that are in place today.  Our condolences go out to his family and his many friends.  He will be missed.

Spencer E. Turner: Iron Man in Chest Waders by Jim Low.
 Everyone leaves tracks. A few blaze trails and open new
frontiers.
Anyone who has attended an annual conference of the Outdoor Writers Association of America knows that it is a group of memorable characters. The
Communicators' craft demands a capacity for attracting attention. When an author
types "end" at the close of his or their career, they have left tracks in the sand. Not all blaze trails, however, and fewer still will be able to look back and see, as Spencer E. Turner can, that they opened new frontiers.
Spence, as his friends know him, took a while to find his calling. Before, during and after serving the U.S. Air Force, he attended various universities, starting out as a business major. But while stationed in Alaska he studied at the University of Alaska and decided he needed to be outdoors, not behind a desk. Accordingly, he changed his major to fisheries science, eventually earning a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin at Stephens Point. He says he struggled with some of his fisheries classes, but he went on to earn a master's degree from Colorado State University. His thesis topic was Microhabitat of Hatchery Rainbow Trout. On the strength of this work, in 1969, he landed a job with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), where he would spend his entire career.
BLAZING TRAILS
Turner belongs to a cohort of resource scientists who entered wide­open fields of
inquiry in the mid­20th century. Little was known about the biology, behavior, food
habits or habitat needs of fish and wildlife at that time. They plunged into these
uncharted fields, exploring the terra incognita of fish and wildlife management.
Among the ground­breaking studies Turner conducted were:
Evaluating the growth and harvest of stocked trout at Lake Taneycomo
Developing Missouri's brown trout stocking program
Evaluating effects of artificial lure regulations on trout survival
Evaluating effects of introducing red­band trout to Missouri waters
Evaluating the stocking triploid (sterile) brown trout as a strategy for
increasing growth rates and trophy fishing potential
Developing methods of improving trout habitat in unstable streams
Launching MDC's ongoing efforts to improve smallmouth bass fishing in
Ozarks streams
The work of Turner and his cohort created an unprecedented body of knowledge
that has served as the basis for managing the fish and wildlife they studied. That was their next challenge. In Spence's case, this meant melding his knowledge of trout and smallmouth bass with stocking/recruitment rates, length and creel limits, fishing method restrictions and other factors to ensure sustainable yields of fish for anglers, then developing management strategies to produce wild and trophy trout and smallmouth bass fisheries.
His research debunked the widely accepted notion that brown trout could not be
overharvested, because they were too difficult to catch. His field work demonstrated that under Missouri's then existing regulations, most brown trout were harvested before they reached trophy size. He also demonstrated that use of natural and soft baits resulted in unacceptable mortality of under­sized trout, a fact that led to implementation of regulations prohibiting such baits in trophy trout areas.
Spence's field work also turned up a population of rainbow trout in southwest
Missouri that were descended from trout brought to the Show­Me State from the
McCloud River in California in the 1800s. This was significant because this strain of trout had been hybridized out of existence in its original home waters. You can now catch pure McCloud rainbow trout at Wire Road Conservation Area in southwest
Missouri.
If imitation truly is the sincerest form of flattery, Turner must feel extremely flattered that several Eastern and Southern states have modeled their own fisheries management programs after the ones he devised.
ROCKING THE BOAT
Some communicators are made, while others are born. Turner seems to have bee
of the latter variety. In 1977 he sent a memo to the chief of MDC's Fisheries Division, advocating a formal communication plan to ensure continued public support for Missouri's burgeoning conservation program. A few months earlier, Missourians had voted to create a 1/8 of 1 percent sales tax for conservation. The tax hardly had taken effect when Turner received a call from one of the supporters of the sales tax initiative, asking why he had heard nothing about implementation of promised programs.
"I believe this is a symptom of a much larger problem," Turner wrote to his
supervisor's boss. "Individuals in our work generally are introverts...we know more
about the effects of our programs on the animals than the effects on the people using the resource. We are also reluctant to inform the public about out programs unless specifically asked...we have to become more involved at the grass­roots level and more aggressive politically...The lines of communication from the public to the Conservation Department must be opened."
Turner went on to suggest ways of keeping citizens informed and engaged
and advocated offering seminars to build conservation employees' communications  skills. He also suggested that public outreach should be included in MDC employees' annual performance evaluations.
Apparently unwilling to wait for others to act, Turner took the ball and ran with it. He organized public meetings, public service announcements, radio interviews,
newspaper feature stories, cooperative promotions with the University of Missouri,
the University Extension Service, the Missouri Farm Bureau, civic club apearances
and PTA presentations. He created an annual Day with Wildlife event to raise his
agency's public profile and inform and involve the public in budding conservation
efforts. Later that year he corresponded with U.S. Sen. John C. Danforth about
potential improvements to a trout stream.
To further build the Conservation Department's public credibility, Turner became a
fixture at meetings of groups such as the Ozark Fly Fishers, helped organized Trout Unlimited (TU) chapters in Kansas City, Bennett Spring, St. Louis, and Columbia, and met with the Missouri Trout Fisherman's Association and Conservation Federation of Missouri. These citizen conservationists were eager for knowledge about and involvement in trout management.
When his best efforts were stalled by institutional inertia or politics, Turner
occasionally was canny and bold enough to feed inside information and tactical
advice to citizen conservationists. These contacts outside government were not
beholden to state officials for their paychecks. It may have looked fishy to his
supervisors, but Turner's fingerprints were hard to find. Agency leadership might not always have been thrilled to follow Spence's activist lead, but he sometimes left them little choice.
One of the greatest challenges for any fisheries or wildlife research biologist is
getting the public to support his or her carefully thought out plans and persuading
policy makers to implement them. Spence had his share of challenges in this regard, but he enjoyed more success than many. This was largely because he possessed more than scientific acumen and missionary zeal. He had a gift for framing a convincing argument.



Weather Forecast

WednesdayA 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly
cloudy, with a high near 83.
ThursdayA chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a
high near 82.
FridayMostly sunny, with a high near 83.
SaturdayMostly sunny, with a high near 85.



Calendar of Events

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

Advanced fly tying techniques aren't about knowing the obscure,
they're about understanding the simple.
Author:   Neil Patterson

Thanks for reading,
Lucy

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

6-25-16



How's Fishing?

The kids have gone back to school and things are quieter on the stream, especially during the week.  The front that went through this week apparently put the fish in a quieter mood as well.  The weather this week will continue to be unsettled off and on.  A chance of pop up thunderstorms all week.
Of course, there are always those who catch bunches of fish no matter what, but for most of us, the catching has been quite a bit slower.
There has been some nice evening fishing on top water using a pale evening dun, an Adam's Parachute, or a terrestrial such as a beetle.
Gray scuds or an RGN are also good choices for the fly rod as well as Walt's worm.
 Marabou jigs continue to be a good choice for everyone (except zone 3, of course) and the colors are fairly consistent.  Gingersnap and salmon colors.  Coincidentally the same colors - salmon peach or brown - that work in zone three using Power Bait.



Fishing Times

August             7:00 a.m.  -   8:00 p.m.

September        7:30 a.m.  -   7:15 p.m.

October             7:30 a.m. -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions  - the water continues to carry quite a bit of stain.  You won't see the super clear water or the low levels that are often found this time of year.  Yet even so, the conditions improve.  If we don't see too many big storms this week to our south, it may clear up quite a bit by the weekend.

For Bennett Spring
8-24-16
Gage house level is 2.04 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 72 in 1936
25th percentile is 99
Median is 127
Mean is 131
75th percentile is 148
current level is 148
Max was 224 in 2011

Niangua River
8-24-16
Gage House reading (water level) is 2.13 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

Minimum was 18 in 2012
25th percentile is 31
Median is 34
Mean is 62
75th percentile is 106
Max is 177 in 2007
Today's reading is 173



What's Working?

From the Fly Case:
Adam's Parachute, 14s and 16.
Walt's Worm
Gray Scud
RGN & Copper Hot Shot
Pale Evening Dun, 14 or 16

Zone 1 & 2
Mega Worm
Brown Wooly Bugger
Kapok
Marabou: Shell & white, salmon, Gingersnap, red & yellow
Possum Hair Roach
White floss jig
Glo Balls: white with red dot, white,
john deere mini jig

Zone 3
Power Bait:  Salmon Peach or Brown



Lunker Club

8-19-16
Rosie Mertens from Jefferson City, MO
2-1/8 pounds on brown power bait in zone 3

8-21-16
Roberta Moore from Jefferson City, MO
2-1/2 pounds on brown power bait in zone 3



Of Interest

There has been a lot of talk recently about fishing with soft hackle flies.  Here is a short article on how to fish them from Louis Cahill on the website ginkandgasolline.com.
I have also had a beautiful book on the subject recommended to me called Tying & Fishing Soft-Hackled Nymphs by Allen McGee. If you are interested in learning more, this would be an excellent choice.  Christmas is right around the corner, it's never to early to drop hints.

  FISHING SOFT HACKLES
SOFT HACKLES ARE THE SHARKS OF THE FLY BOX.

Like the shark, the soft hackle is one of the oldest of its ilk, and like those ancient predators, it has evolved very little from its inception. Like the shark, it is a deadly design that could not be improved upon. Take, for example, the Kebari flies used by tenkara anglers for hundreds of years. Basically Soft Hackles with a reverse hackle. So effective, that traditional tenkara anglers only fish one pattern. Many modern fly anglers overlook traditional Soft Hackle patterns that are as effective today as ever.

There are two primary reasons for the effectiveness of the soft hackle. For starters, it’s the ultimate impressionistic pattern. It looks like almost everything on the aquatic menu. A fish who is looking for something specific is very likely to see it in a soft hackle. The second reason is, there’s just no wrong way to fish one. If you struggle with getting a drag free drift, a soft hackle is a very forgiving pattern. As long as it is in the water, it will produce fish.

As I said, there is no wrong way to fish these flies, but there are some proven tactics you can employ. For starters, dead drifting the fly as a nymph is never a bad plan. The Soft Hackle is as effective in this role as any pattern. That said, the dead drift does not take advantage of some of the pattern’s unique properties.

Perhaps the most common and most productive presentation for a Soft Hackle is the swing. The hackle has a tendency to trap an air bubble making the fly a natural emerger pattern. There are tying techniques, which I will go into, that enhance this effect. When fished deep and swung to the surface, the glowing air bubble inside the hackle is more than any trout can resist. One of my favorite ways to rig this pattern is to drop it about sixteen inches behind a Wooly Bugger with some weight in front of the Bugger. Drift the team deep through a run then lift them to the surface or quarter them down and across and let then swing and hold on.

When fishing from a boat, it’s very effective to cast a Soft Hackle straight across the current and retrieve it slowly, about four inches at strip. A hand-twist retrieve works well. This is also effective when teamed with a Bugger. Even more fun, drop the Soft Hackle behind an Elk Haired Caddis and inch them back across the current. You’ll get some explosive takes on the dry. This team works very well with a drift and swing presentation as well. The Soft Hackle is always a good choice in a dry dropper team.

When rising fish refuse everything you offer, the Soft Hackle can often save the day. Treat it with some floatant and fish it in the film. As a floating nymph, it will entice the most selective of fish.



Weather Forecast

Thursday: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 1pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. Heat index values as high as 95. Southwest wind 7 to 9 mph.

Friday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83. Southeast wind 3 to 7 mph.

Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 84.

Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 85.

Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 86.

Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 84.



Calendar of Events

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

Spring creeks demand your time and attention like jealous lovers...by their very nature, spring creeks allow no suspension of disbelief. What you see is what you get...they hold their share of secrets, but the presence or absence of feeding trout is seldom one of them. Because of the clarity and delicacy of these waters, experienced hands can usually determine at at glance whether the switch that tells flies to hatch and trout to feed is in the on position or not.

Author:  E Donall Thomas Jr.

Published:  Dream Fish and Road Trips

Thanks for reading.  Lucy

Wednesday, August 17, 2016


August 17, 2016


How's Fishing

Fishing has been really good this whole season.  The fish may be a tad smaller, not noticeably so, with the exception of the super big lunkers that were caught this week.  The water continues be high and somewhat discolored.   Usually by this time of year the water has receded and is gin clear.  This is an upside down year with those conditions happening the first part of the season and typical spring conditions happening now.
The best success has been fishing deep with dark lures such as a Walt's worm or an RGN.  Copper Hot shots and brassies are also doing well.
As far as top water action, terrestrials do well this time of year, and the murky water hides a less than perfect cast.  All fun!



Fishing Times

August        7:00 a.m.                   -   8:00 p.m.

September   7:30 a.m.                  -   7:15 p.m.

October       7:30 a.m.                   -   6:30 p.m.




Water Conditions
8-17-16
For Bennett Spring

Gage house level is 2.21 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 75 in 1941
25th percentile is 101
Median is 125
Mean is 133
75th percentile is 154
current level  is 190
Max was 295 in 2013

Niangua River

Gage House reading (water level) is 2.67 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

Minimum was 11 in 2007
25th percentile is 27
Median is 47
Mean is 61
75th percentile is 72
Max is 240 in 2013
Today's reading is 281



What's Working?
RGN, all colors, darker are the best
Walt’s Worm
 Copper Hot Shot
Crane Fly
Salmon fur bug, no bead

Zone 1 or 2

• Marabou – gingersnap, orange and black, orange, white, salmon
• Brassies, orange, brass
• Glo-balls: original tri color, jimi Hendrix, champagne glo-ball
• orange rooster tail
• ‘spoons’
• White floss

Zone 3

• Power bait: orange, rainbow, brown
• zeke's corn yellow bait
• bubble gum Mouse tails
• Orange Berkley Gulp Minnow Grubs


Lunker Club

8-11-16

Charlie Richards from Festus, MO
2 pounds on champagne glo-ball

8-12-16

Nick Wray from Harrisonville, MO
5 pounds, 13 ounces on a white marabou in zone 1
           
Shannon Wray from Harrisonville, MO
3 pounds, 8 ounces on black & white spinner in zone 2

Nick Wray from Harrisonville, MO
8 pounds, 2 ounces on a white marabou in zone 1

Kevin Goucher from Warsaw, MO
2 pounds 2 ounces on a salmon marabou in zone 1

Nick Lock from Jefferson City, MO
2 pounds on home made bait in zone 3

8-13-16
Chase Palmer from Center MO
4 pounds on yellow power bait in zone 3

Charlie Baker from Kansas City, MO
2-1/2 pound brown trout on brown power bait in zone 3



Calendar of Events

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

I've gone fishing thousands of times in my life, and I have never once felt unlucky or poorly paid for those hours on the water.

Author:
William Tapply

Published:
A Fly-Fishing Life

Thanks for reading!  Lucy