Wednesday, June 29, 2016

June 30, 2016

How's Fishing?

Fishing continues to be great. It's summertime and everyone at Bennett is cool!  There has been a lot of talk about browns.  They are a favorite fish to catch for most anglers because of their 'spunk'.  I've added an article under the "of interest" heading that an expert angler from Bass Pro wrote.  I found it interesting, you may as well.  The latest lure to use at Bennett to catch a brown is a size 18 Renegade.  Remember to measure your catch, a brown needs to be 15 inches long to put on your stringer.
The Lunker Board at our store is going into the third sheet.  This is the most lunkers we have seen since we came here seven years ago.  2016 is just an amazing year!
If we get the rain that is predicted, the water may be a little murkier than it is now.  If you are a weekend angler, you may be able to get away with a heavier tippet material and darker lures.  Remember that rain in Kansas City or St. Louis does not mean that we are getting rain at Bennett Spring.  Check the weather for Long Lane, MO to get the most accurate current weather for this area.

Fishing Times

June/July            6:30 a.m.  -   8:30 p.m.

August               7:00 a.m.  -   8:00 p.m.

September         7:30 a.m.  -   7:15 p.m.

October              7:30 a.m.  -   6:30 p.m.


Water Conditions - Amazingly clear and slow for this time of year.  Almost record low for the Spring Branch.  The Niangua is running a bit higher than average level.

June 28, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 1.91 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 78 in 1934
current level is 117
25th percentile is 130
Median is 160
Mean is 189
75th percentile is 210
Max was 653 in 1932

June 28, 2016 for Niangua River: Moving well, above average for discharge and levels.

Gage House reading (water level) is 2.16 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:

minimum was 28 in 2012
25th percentile is 57
Median is 98
Today's reading is 178
Mean is 214
75th percentile is 367
Max is 694 in 2008



What's Working?

From the Fly Box:

hoppers
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue
copper hot shots, all colors
black zebra midge
white mega worm
black caddis

Zone 1 or 2

rooster tail:  bumble bee, brown glitter, or black glitter with gold spinner
glo ball: original tri color,
White floss
possum hair roach
brown roach
white mega worm
olive wooly with spinner
marabou, black & yellow

Zone 3

white trout magnet
salmon peach or white power bait.



Lunker club

6-25-16
Issac Bohm (age 11) from Huntsville, MO
2-1/4 pounds in zone 1 on a self tie - peach

Ron Tilson from Wichita KS
2-1/4 pounds on yellow plastic worm in zone 3

Gavin Jones (age 9)
From Farmington, MO
2-1/4 pounds on green deer hair jig.

Jessica Parsons from St. James, MO
2-1/2 pounds (brown) on white dough bait in zone 3

6-26-16
Steve Hermach from Ballwin, MO
3 pounds on a white worm in zone 3

Tom Dobson from St. Louis, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

6-27-16
Glen Mazuranic from High Ridge MO
2-1/4 pounds on olive wooly with spinner in zone 1

6-28-16
Pam Todd from Lee's Summit, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black glitter rooster tail in zone 1

Hunter Todd from Centerview, MO
2 pounds on a white mega worm in zone 1

6-29-16

Connor Todd from Blue Springs, MO
2.2 pounds on Apricot glo-ball in zone 1

Lonny Todd from Lee's Summit, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 1

Jan Mitchell from Warrenton, MO
2 fish, 2 pounds plus on a pink plastic 'jig' in zone 3



Of Interest
This article from Bass Pro is a little long, but I found it interesting so I'm sharing with you.

Best Bet for Brown Trout
Posted by  Jason Akl
April 4, 2013

The brown trout (Salmo trutta) is possibly the most popular of all the trout species targeted by fly fishers. Be it their willingness to rise to dead-drifted dry flies or give chase to a swinging streamer; brown trout are fancied the world over. Originally the brown trout was imported from its native waters in Europe and western Asia to lakes and streams in New York and Michigan in 1883.

Brown trout are one of the most widespread species of the trout and salmon family.
Brown trout have thrived in their new home, and have taken up permanent residency in all of our upper Great Lakes waters. Currently, brown trout are one of the most widespread species of the trout and salmon family. The reason for the brown's great success in the U.S. is that this fish can live in higher water temperatures than the other salmon and trout; also it is very adaptable to varying bodies of water.

Although the brown trout is such a plentiful species, do not be fooled into thinking that fishing for these freshwater predators will be easy; browns can be the most finicky eaters of all the different trout species. A good understanding of the fish's behaviors and plenty of time out on your favorite waters will help give you a shot at landing a true lunker of a brown.

Lifecycle
Since brown trout spawn in tributary streams through September and October, they begin to take up residence near stream outlets in spring and early summer. After entering into a particular stream, brown trout spawners actively seek out shallow, gravel or rocky areas where they can commence the spawning process. Female browns create redds in the gravel bottom, where the spawning fish will eventually deposit the eggs and sperm of the new generation. The process is completed when the female covers the bed with gravel.

On average, lake-run adult browns weigh about 8 pounds, although many of the individuals who frequent the river are much larger. Of all the different trout species browns enjoy a rather long life span that can reach upwards of 13 years.

Fishing Techniques
When thinking about successful brown trout fishing techniques, no single technique stands out from the rest. Many different flies can be used to get the fish to bite, but tailoring yourself to the specific seasonal feeding personalities of the browns increase your chances of hooking fish and hooking them consistently.

As with all other trout groups, winter browns are a group less prone to chasing fast moving presentations and flies fished with erratic movements. Cold temperatures produce lackadaisical feeding behavior in fish so getting your fly in the strike zone is a necessity. Nymph fishing is probably the best technique to utilize during the cold winter months seeing as it is a quiet presentation that covers lots of water. Nymphing is excellent for repeatedly placing your fly in the strike zone with minimal effort.

Depending on the body of water, you will be fishing in cold water more often that not, a floating line coupled with long leaders will be most productive. Heavily weighted nymph flies and an indicator system are a necessity to get down deep and attract attention from fish while still allowing the angler to detect light takes. Bead flies are a good idea for these types of fishing conditions because they have a little more weight than standard nymphs plus extra flashing to get those lazy fish feeding.

Summer fishing for browns can be a little more enjoyable for the angler seeing as you will have the opportunity to present the fish with many different floating patterns. If you are fishing a body of water that is unknown to you or it is very early in the morning, searching flies swung close to cover paired with timely strips can produce a voracious bite. If you are looking to catch fish on dries, long casts towards overgrown grassy banks will produce best. Cast upstream and across from your target at a forty-five degree angle and allow the fly to drift drag-free downstream.

If you are fishing terrestrial patterns, then a loud plop on the entry and a few strips during the drift will help to get fish looking at what you are offering. Another good idea for summer fishing is to use a dry and dopper technique for browns. This technique is simply attaching a high floating dry pattern like a deer hair grasshopper to the end of your line and running a second smaller nymph pattern from the hook of the first fly. In this aspect you will be covering a few different zones of the water column and allowing the fish to choose what they prefer best.



The dry fly in this presentation will also act as attractant for the nymph and as a strike indicator. Last but not least is the wet fly approach to brown trout fishing. As terrestrial insects fall to the water surface, most will drown and get pulled below the waters surface, where browns will feed on them relentlessly.

Having a few soft hackle patterns that emulate these drowning critters will again help you to increase your odds in catching browns. The wet fly swing is a relatively easy technique whereby the anglers' casts downstream at a 45-degree angle to their target and lets the fly swing slowly across the current until it reaches a position completely below the angler. Repeated casts down and across will effectively cover lots of water and shows potential fish your fly at many different angles and speeds.

Fly Selection
Brown trout are notorious for eating almost any desirable food item that it can fit into their mouths. Browns regularly consume a wide variety of aquatic insects and invertebrates, as well as tiny fish and crayfish. Along with these aquatic forms of food, browns seem to have a particular taste for land insects like ants, beetles, gnats, caterpillars and inch worms. They are known also to eat frogs and the occasional mouse. With such a diverse diet coupled with longevity and intelligence, you can see how one might find it a little hard to choose the right fly on any given day.

To the delight of most fly fishermen, and sometimes to their frustration, brown trout are also known to be voracious surface feeders that are a delight to catch on a dry fly. Unfortunately for most, browns can be very discriminating between a natural insect and a well-crafted imitation making for some very long, slow days in the river. When trying to decide what fly to use on your next fishing trips keep in mind that similarly with all other types of trout no one fly can guarantee that you will catch fish. A good idea is to try and tailor your flies to the water conditions that you will be fishing and to the time of the year it is. For brown trout this customizing of your fly box can be very crucial to one's success.

In early spring, brown trout will be actively searching out aquatic insect forage. The stream bottom critters this time of the year are very large chucked full of nutrients making them a tantalizing treat for browns. Caddis cases and mayfly nymphs are your best bet to keeping the action steady, with the darker shaded patterns producing best. Most hatching nymphs in spring need to be dark in color so that when they hatch they can draw in as much heat as possible to dry out and start their short life cycle. Mottled dark browns, black, and olive will be what you see most from hatching aquatic insects so having flies with these colors is a good idea.

As you move more towards the long dog days of summer, brown trout will certainly still be feeding on nymph patterns but a shift in their diet will become prominent. Browns are the ultimate opportunistic feeder and what better time of the year to take advantage of this behavior than summer with all the hatching terrestrial insects. If you plan on fishing early morning in midsummer then a good idea is to use a large searching pattern such as a leech or woolly bugger. Browns have a tendency to tuck themselves tight into cover and slowly stripping these patterns in and out of cover will produce tantalizing strikes.

Many different flies can be used to get the fish to bite.
Around noon it is a good idea to switch up from your searching pattern and move to using terrestrial patterns especially if there is a breeze out. Bugs will get swept from the fields and woods into the water and browns will be there waiting to feed. Grasshopper patterns with deer hair that float high in the water column are a good bet to start out with while moth, ants and beetles also produce well. If you are interested in fishing terrestrial patterns but are confused as to what the fish might be feeding on take a few simple minutes to walk through the woods and see what is about. Spotting grasshoppers and moths should be no problem, but it takes a keen eye to watch for ants, caterpillars and beetles.



During fall and early winter the feeding habits if the brown trout seem to digress a little. Yes, you can still catch plenty of trout with nymphs but using minnow imitations and egg patterns seems to produce the biggest fish. As the lake run fish begin to enter the streams in order to spawn their respective diets have been focused mainly on baitfish so using large streamers with lots of flash is a good way of inviting a strike. Once the fish start to make their way to the redds their appetites will slow a bit, but yarn eggs in bright oranges and pinks will catch some good fish. At this time of the year another good approach is to use aggravator flies such as leech or baitfish patterns. Seeing as the fish's appetite has slowed, their strike on the patterns will be simply because of aggression and instinct.

Weather & Sunlight
Heavy rain, as with all other trout species, can be a very important variable in the size and number of fish you catch. As the level of the body of water increases and the clarity decreases due to rain, browns will be drawn out of their tight cover to feed on drowned insects. This pattern of moving out from cover will make it very hard for fly anglers to target fish simply because fish could be feeding anywhere throughout the river. During the spawn, the rising water will allow lake-run fish to travel safely up small creeks and rivers to their upstream spawning grounds.

While rising rivers help bring spawning fish upstream, dropping water levels will hold lake runners in deep holes providing ideal fishing conditions. If you are looking to catch lunker brown trout with any success, you have planned your fishing trips around these rising and falling water conditions in fall. Ideally fishing for browns is best if you can reach the river 1-2 days after a light rain, or 3-4 days after a heavy rain. The water level should be just starting to drop and have a slightly tinted color.

The amount of sunlight on the water is not as important to brown trout fishing as other species of trout. If you present these freshwater predators with the right fly they will take it regardless of the conditions or water levels. With that in mind do not forget that fish are very quick at picking up shadows on the water and spook easily, so when the sun is high be sure to keep out of the rays and be aware of casting your shadow on the water. When fishing remember to always start your day off downstream of where you want to end up and work your way upstream. By fishing upstream you will be approaching the fish from behind and not kicking river bottom sediment into the holes that you want to fish.

This colorful and feisty fish will provide exciting fishing. It can be a strong, ferocious fighter and a challenge to any experienced fly fishing enthusiasts.




Weather Forecast

Thursday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83. South wind 6 to 9 mph.

Friday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 80. Chance of precipitation is 60%..

Saturday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Cloudy, with a high near 80.

Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 83.

Independence Day: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 85.

Tuesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 89.



Calendar for 2016

June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting

July 26th & 27th Moss cutting

August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

A fisherman is always hopeful -- nearly always more hopeful than he has any right to be.
Author:
Roderick Haig-Brown

Thanks for reading!
Lucy

Thursday, June 23, 2016



How's Fishing

The general trend of this year so far has been a very clear and slow moving Bennett Spring branch and Niangua River.  There was a brief storm this last week that brought water levels closer to the normal range. The water is getting clearer every day, so keep that in mind as you plan your trips.  What has been working this week will change up a bit as the water does.
  Father's Day weekend proved for most anglers to be a great one.  There were stringers of larger fish and quite a few lunkers as well.  The action continues this week, fishing deep (remember trout like colder water) is more productive than top water with one or two exceptions.  Grasshoppers, small and brown, and black caddis are both good choices.



Fishing Times

 June/July        6:30 a.m.                     -   8:30 p.m.
August             7:00 a.m.                   -   8:00 p.m.
September     7:30 a.m.                   -   7:15 p.m.
October           7:30 a.m.                   -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions :   The color and clarity are improving daily.
June 21, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 2.02 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 86 in 1934
current level is 141
25th percentile is 161
Median is 229
Mean is 209
75th percentile is 225
Max was 2020 in 1935

June 21, 2016 for Niangua River: .Moving well, just above average for discharge and levels.

Gage House reading (water level) is 2.22 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:
Today's reading is 189
minimum was 49 in 2012
25th percentile is 88
Median is 175
Mean is 303
75th percentile is 474
Max was 1120 in 2015



What's Working?

From the Fly Box:
hoppers
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue, original
copper zebra midge
rust  RGN
copper hot shots, all colors
black zebra midge
white mega worm
black caddis

Zone 1 or 2
White mini jig
white floss mini jig
red brassie
John deere mini jig
rooster tail: minnow, gold, bumble bee, brown glitter, or black glitter with gold spinner
glo ball: white, original tri color, jimi hendrix, gater (green with orange spot)
Marabou - black & yellow - first thing in morning, moss & Brown, olive and brown gingersnap, ginger, yellow & brown, shell & brown
green  Wooly bugger, fished deep
silver super duper (zone 2 only)

Zone 3

white trout magnet
salmon peach, green glitter, salmon red - power bait.
orange power bait worm - plastic type



Lunker Club

6-12-16
Jeffrey Finch from Otterville, MO
2-1/2 pounds on white floss in zone 2

6-15-16
Tom Rembe from Seymour, IA
2-1/2 pounds on a blue crackleback in zone 1

6-16-16
Tracy Scherder Woodworth from St. Charles, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a orange power bait worm

Cindy Monnig from Jeff City, MO
2 pounds on a red brassie in zone 2

6-18-16
Eugene Bruggenann from Highland, IL
2-1/2 pounds on fluorescent red power bait

6-20-16
Eric Hendrix from Sullivan, IL
3-1/4 pounds on white fur bug in zone 1

Zoey Todd from Independence, MO-
2.5 pounds on gray & white zonker rabbit in zone 1

Zoey Todd from Independence, MO - second lunker
2.6 pounds on gray & white zonker rabbit in zone 1

6-21-16
Carletta West from Caledonia, MO
2-1/4 pounds on green glitter dough bait in zone 3

6-23-16
Brenda Looper from Buckeye, AZ
2-1/2 pounds on a super duper - silver



Of Interest

One of the biggest sellers at Bennett Spring is the marabou jig.  Most anglers have their favorite way to fish these, but the following may be of interest to those of you who don't or haven't tried them in the past.  This is copied from Missouritrouthunter.com.

Marabou jigs (not Crappie jigs) will flat out catch trout if you know how to fish them. Many fishermen are under the mistaken assumption that marabou jigs imitate minnows, but they actually imitate the swimming action of certain large aquatic insects. by dancing up and down rather than side to side. In fact, a marabou jig is technically a fly and can be used on waters designated as fly-fishing only. Even so, this lure is best fished with a spinning outfit. Trout and salmon appear to be programmed by nature to react to this motion almost without fail, so these lures will work even when the actual insects they imitate are not present. In fact, when marabou first became popular as a fly-tying material, some states actually outlawed its usage in some waters due to the massive success fishermen were having and how it actually depleted some trout and salmon populations.
To achieve the proper effect, cast and allow the jig the sink for a few moments. Then retrieve the jig at a slow rate while simultaneously and rapidly twitching your rod tip up and down. Rapid twitching means RAPID twitching. Your rod hand should bounce down perhaps 4x per second while your retrieve hand is making no more than one revolution per second. Try counting "one-one-thou-sand, two-one-thou-sand..." and so on, while bouncing your rod hand on each syllable. It takes a little practice to get the feel of it. Many trout fishermen are jig fisherman exclusively and can't imagine why anyone would consider fishing any other way. And with the success they enjoy, it's hard to argue with them. Favorite jig colors are white, hot pink, and black & yellow mixed. There are also those that prefer to fish these jigs under a bobber or strike indicator, just giving the lure an occasional twitch. Using this method will work better with a smaller jig -- sometimes called micro jigs -- and fished very close to the bottom. This is basically nymph fishing with a spinning rod. Cast upstream, and allow the lure to drift back toward you, passing the jig by as many fish as possible.



Weather Forecast
Friday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 89. Heat index values as high as 95. South wind 5 to 7 mph.

Saturday: Partly sunny, with a high near 90.

Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 92.

Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 90.

Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 87.

Wednesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 84.



Calendar of Events

June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting

July 26th & 27th Moss cutting

August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017


Quote of the Day

Perhaps it was only a trick of the water, a trompe l'oeil of the late summer light, or maybe just one of those hallucinatory visions provoked by hours on end of upstream nymphing. You know the feeling: cast, lift, reach, lift, cast again, over and over, always staring, until the world fades away, sun and bird song and roar of water, until all that's left is the endless downstream dance of the strike indicator

Author:  Robert F. Jones

Thanks for reading, Lucy

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

June 6-14-16



How's Fishing?

Fishing at Bennett continues to be a really great experience for this time of year.    The water is low, slow and clear.  So much so that you might think you were fishing the stream in August, except there are more big fish!   We have had as many two pounds or better fish brought up to Weaver's Tackle Store for the Lunker Club this year than we had the entire last year.  A pound and a half to a pound and three quarters are very typical sizes to see on stringers.
There has been periods of top water action for those of you that like that style of fishing.  Renegades, pale evening dun, and black or tan caddis have all been doing well.




Fishing Times
June/July   6:30 a.m.                   -   8:30 p.m.
August        7:00 a.m.                   -   8:00 p.m.
September 7:30 a.m.                   -   7:15 p.m.
October       7:30 a.m.                   -   6:30 p.m.

Water Conditions

June 12, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 1.88 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 81 in 1977
current level is 105
25th percentile is 129
Median is 190
Mean is 209
75th percentile is 257
Max was 409 in 1995


June 12, 2016 for Niangua River: The river isat 51 cubic feet per second.  This is a record low for this date


Gage House reading (water level) is 1.14 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:
Today's reading is 51
minimum was 61 in 2012
25th percentile is 132
Median is 317
Mean is 609
75th percentile is 865
Max was 2210 in 1993



What's Working?

San Juan worm - red
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue, holographic green, pearl
copper zebra midge
gray RGN
preggy scud - tan with a hot spot in the center.
black zebra midge
Walt's worm

Zone 1 or 2
John deere mini jig
White floss and white sparkle; pale aqua sparkle grub
rooster tail: minnow, gold, bumble bee, brown glitter, or black glitter with gold spinner
glo ball: original tri color, jimi hendrix, red & yellow
Marabou - black & yellow, moss & Brown, orange & yellow, gingersnap, ginger, yellow & brown, shell & brown, pink & white
Copper Brassie
Black Wooly worm with spinner
black roach
pheasant grub with tail
pink or white mega worm

Zone 3
white trout magnet
salmon peach, yellow, orange, brown, salmon red - power bait.
white trout magnet
white worm - plastic type



Lunker Club
6-7-16
Terry Klamert from Imperial, MO
2 pounds on black rooster tail in zone 1

Linda Calhoun from Lawson, MO
2-1/4 pounds on orange power bait in zone 3

Jerry Lewis from Staunton, IL
4-1/2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 1

Sharon Owens from Chesterfield, MO
2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

Glenn Slonecker from Fairway, KS
4 pounds on orange powerbait in zone 3

6-9-16
Suzie Rager from Evansville, IN
2 pounds on a black & yellow marabou

Bruce Baird from Mt. Vernon, IL
2 pounds on a pink & white marabou in zone 2

Jeffrie Smith from Columbia, MO
3-1/2 pounds on a white mega worm in zone 2

Ron Heins from Liberty, MO
2 pounds, 2 ounces on a blue crackleback in zone 1


6-10-16
Jeremy Robeen from St. Louis MO
2-1/2 pounds on a plastic white worm in zone 3

Travis Callahan from Steelville, MO
2-1/4  pounds on a ginger  marabou in zone 1

Jim Lucas from O'Fallon, MO
3 pounds, 10 ounces on brown bait in zone 3

Chamberlain Albert (age 7) from Tonganoxie KS
2 pounds on a red salmon egg powerbait in zone 3

Colby Guggey from Kansas City, MO
2.1 pounds on broken Minnow in zone 2

Todd Groshans from Colllinsville, IL
2 pounds on tan powerbait in zone 3

Bruce Baird from Mt. Vernon, IL
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

Ken Unmisig from Lebanon, MO
2 1/4 pounds on a red and yellow glo ball in zone 2

6-11-16

Kyn Gordon from Palmyra, MO
2-1/4 pounds on an Easter Egg glo ball in zone 1

Sharon Owens from Chesterfield, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a black & yellow jig in zone 1

Ethan Hampton from Festus, MO
2 pounds on a gingersnap marabou in zone1

Roberta Moore from Jeff City, MO
2-3/4 pounds on brown power bait in zone 3
6-13-16

David Todd from Lee's Summit, MO
2 1/4 pounds on a pink mega worm in zone 1

Pam Todd from Lee's Summit, MO
2 pounds 3 ounces on a black glitter rooster tail in zone 1

6-14-16
Wesley Beason from Topeka, KS
3-1/2 pounds on original trout magnet in zone 3

Matt Hephner from Buckner, MO
2 pounds on a gingersnap in zone 2

Aaron Dixon from Columbia, MO
2.1 pounds on a Hopper in zone 2

Weather Forecast

Thursday: Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 93.
Friday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 91.
Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 87.
Sunday: Sunny, with a high near 89.
Monday: Sunny, with a high near 89.



Calendar of Events

June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting
July 26th & 27th Moss cutting
August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting
October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting
Saturday, October 8, 2016:  Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM
October 31st: End of Regular Season
November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

It is quite easy to debase the sport, change its values, dilute its ethics and destroy its traditional associations with quietness, relaxation and the opportunity to think. Angling is not a competitive sport. The fisherman'- s only real competition is with his quarry and his only real challenge is the challenge to himself. Nothing can add to this, but the blight of interhuman competition can certainly detract from it.
Author:  Roderick Haig-Brown
Published:  Bright Waters, Bright Fish

Thanks for reading!  Lucy

Monday, June 6, 2016

June 8, 2016



How's Fishing

The water clarity and the mild weather have brought people out of their lazyboys and into the water.  Check out the pictures of how clear the water is and the size of the fish on the stringers of folks walking around.  It was a great weekend.  The week is looking even better!
The classic lures are working, john deere and original tri color glo balls, for example.  There has been a bit of top water action lately.  A renegade, cinnamon ant, or an olive griffith's gnat is a good place to start.  The browns that are in the stream are creating a lot of talk.  They tend to be fighters and can make for an interesting catching event.  Remember the length must be 15 inches to put it on your stringer.
Copper Zebra midge or Hot shots in brown or gray are working well for deeper water.
The possum hair roach continues to be a good 'go-to' lure.   Fish is deeper and let it tumble along the bottom.  More easily done now with the sandy bottom of the stream that the Christmas flood created.



Fishing Times
June/July   6:30 a.m.         -   8:30 p.m.
August        7:00 a.m.         -   8:00 p.m.
September        7:30 a.m.         -   7:15 p.m.
October        7:30 a.m.         -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions

June 6, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 1.88 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 79 in 1936
25th percentile is 131
current level is 111
Median is 181
Mean is 203
75th percentile is 240
Max was 477 in 1994


June 6, 2016 for Niangua River:  The river is almost a record low for this date

Gage House reading (water level) is 1.41 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:
Today's reading is 52
minimum was 51 in 2012
25th percentile is 162
Median is 275
Mean is 315
75th percentile is 444
Max was 703 in 2008



What's Working?

san juan worm - red
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue, holographic green, pearl
scuds, olive or orange
copper or black zebra midge
gray RGN
preggy scud - tan with a hot spot in the center.


Zone 1 or 2

John deere mini jig
White floss and white sparkle; pale aqua sparkle grub
rooster tail: minnow, gold, bumble bee, brown glitter, or black with gold spinner
glo ball: original tri color, jimi hendrix
Marabou - red & black, orange & yellow, gingersnap, yellow & brown, shell & brown
Copper Brassie
Black Wooly worm with spinner
black roach

Zone 3

rainbow or pink power bait
salmon peach, yellow - power bait.
white trout magnet

Lunker Club

5-29-16
Hunter Thornton from Bethalto, IL
2 pounds on a brown glo ball in zone 2

6-2-16
Chris Sprinkel from Carlinville, IL
3 pounds 8 ounces on a white chenille grub in zone 2

6-3-16
Darby Seabaugh from Sullivan, IL
2-1/4 pounds on a night crawler in zone 3

Sheri Seabaugh from Sullivan, IL
2 pounds on a night crawler in zone 3

Annette Long from Amazonia, MO
2-1/4 pounds on peach and salmon power bait in zone 3

Brad Harris from Raymore, MO
2.2 pounds on a black zebra midge in zone 1

6-4-16
Dallas MIldfelt from Chicago IL
3 pounds on a white marabou in zone 2

6-5-16
Scott Veeck from Wadesville, IN
2-1/4 pounds on a black & gold marabou in zone 2

Les Bodensted from Dellwood MO
2 pounds on a  black & yellow marabou in zone 1

6-6-162,416 o
Shawna Gordon from Palmyra MO
2.3 pounds on a T..B.'s Best in zone 1

Of Interest
Hatchery Manager, Ben Havens, sent out a monthly Trout Tag Sales Comparison.  It seems that tag sales are up almost 7% over last  year.

Tag Sales year to date for 2016 are 47,956.  Last year's to date sales were 44,930 .The total difference for the year is 3,026 or 6.73%.

This month in May for 2015 there were 17,214 sold, 2,322 of those were kids' tags.  May of 2016 saw 17,804 sales with 2,416 of those kids' tags.

With the amazing weather we are having and good hatchery management, this trend should continue for at least the next few months. It should be a great summer to be at Bennett Spring.


Weather Forecast

Wednesday: Sunny, with a high near 83.
Southeast wind 5 to 8 mph.
Thursday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 89.
Friday: Sunny, with a high near 91.
Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 90.
Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 90.
Monday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 88.





Calendar of Events

June 11 & 12: Free Fishing Weekend

June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting

July 26th & 27th Moss cutting

August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society.
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017





                                                    Quote of the Week
The capture of a really big fish is a pleasant surprise; were it a forgone conclusion, angling would be robbed of much of its fascination. It is the unknown in our sport which is so tempting.

Author:  E. Marshall Hardy

Published: Mirror of Angling 1937

Thanks for reading!  Lucy

Wednesday, June 1, 2016


June 1, 2016



How's Fishing?

Flocks of people came to Bennett this weekend to escape the storms that hit north and south of us.  It was a beautiful Memorial Day with only a few showers.  Tons of fish caught and quite a few larger stringers of fish.  We have even seen a couple of browns that are of a legal size.
Traditional lures were working well.  Some that are consistent are gingersnap, black and yellow marabou, white floss, renegades, olive zebras midges and crane flies.  Zone three has been a good spot to use the salmon peach power bait and worms. We saw nineteen fish that were over two pounds caught this week.
For those of you making your first trip this weekend, remember that there was a flood at Christmas time and the stream is a changed place.  Where you remember a rock, there is a hole and where there was a hole is now filled with gravel.  Not at many weeds/moss are growing as in years past. The stream bed was scoured clean with the force of the water.   Dredging will happen after the season is over.



Fishing Times

June/July   6:30 a.m.                     -   8:30 p.m.
August        7:00 a.m.                     -   8:00 p.m.
September   7:30 a.m.                   -   7:15 p.m.
October        7:30 a.m.                   -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions
The water is clear with some color to it.  Very low and running slowly for this time of year.
May 31, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 1.95 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 78 in 1936
25th percentile is 136
current level is 125
Median is 190
Mean is 216
75th percentile is 267
Max was 511 in 1995


May 31, 2016 for Niangua River:

Gage House reading (water level) is 1.84 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:
Today's reading is 95
minimum was 71 in 2014
25th percentile is 149
Median is 252
Mean is 374
75th percentile is 470
Max was 1240 in 2015



What's Working?

From the fly box

crane fly
san juan worm - white
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue, holographic green, pearl
scuds, olive or orange
olive zebra midge

Zone 1 or 2

peacock hurl mini jig
White floss
rooster tail: minnow, gold, bumble bee, brown glitter, or black with gold spinner
glo ball: original tri color, jimi hendrix
Marabou - black, red & yellow, gingersnap, yellow & brown, shell & brown

Zone 3
rainbow power bait
salmon peach, yellow - power bait.
salmon eggs




Lunker Club

5-27-16
Carl Jackson from Marshfield, MO
3-1/4 pounds on a gingersnap marabou in zone 2

Darren O'Neill from Blue Springs, MO
2+ (catch & release) on a peach fur bug in zone 2

5-28-16

Ryan Crissler from Lawrence, KS
2-3/4 pounds on a black &  red mepps in zone 2

David Houk from Milan MO
2-1/2 pounds on salmon peach dough bait in zone 3

Ellysa Gallinger (age 13) from Keaney, MO
2-3/4 pounds on salmon peach dough bait in zone 3

Zane Gragg (age 11)  from Blue Springs, MO
2-1/2  pounds on an orange glo ball inzone 1

Trent Bick from Batchtown, IL
2 pounds on a tinsel jig in zone 1

Nate Bick from Batchtown IL
2-1/4 pounds on a tinsel jig in zone 1

Kenton Mayes (age 12) from Wellsville, MO
2 pounds on a red & white marabou in zone 2

Karissa Creel from Brookfield, MO
2-3/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 1

Caleb Martin (age 14) from Newburg, IN
2-3/4 pounds on a white mini thread jig in
 zone 2

Dee Nibarger from Springfield, MO
3 pounds on cheese power bait in zone 3

Nick Mount from Creve Coeur, MO
2 pounds on a white jig in zone 2

5-29-16
Max Sibley (age 8) from Marceline, MO
2-3/4 pounds on a marshmallow in the river

Jason Pauley from Sweet Springs, MO
2-3/8 pounds on a white bomb (self tie) in
 zone 2

Hunter Thornton from Bethalto, IL
2 pounds on a brown glo ball in zone2

5-30-16
Drew Young from Lake St. Louis, MO
3 pounds on pink power bait in zone 3

Parker Daniels (age 13) from St. Joseph, MO
2-1/2 pounds on a brown & black mini jig

Diana Reed from St. James, MO
2-1/4 pounds on Hatchery pellet power bait in zone 3



Of Interest

This piece of legislation is very important to all of us who frequent the parks in Missouri.  Please help us to get the word out on this issue which will be on the November ballot.

May 9, 2016
Initiative protecting Missouri’s natural resources and state parks has been overwhelming popular with voters for three decades
Jefferson City, MO
Gov. Jay Nixon today announced that Missouri’s Parks, Soils and Water sales tax, which is up for renewal this year, will appear on the November ballot.

“Missouri’s farm families have long been innovators and leaders in protecting our soil, air and water. That’s why we were the first state in the nation to pass a Parks, Soils and Water sales tax more than 30 years ago,” Gov. Nixon said. “Missourians have given this program their support for several decades, and I am confident that support will continue for many years to come.”

“Soil and water stewardship is important to Missouri farmers, and we are fortunate to have a state program that helps farmers implement costly but needed conservation practices on their land.  Missouri is the envy of other states with the improvements made possible by the one-tenth cent parks and soils sales tax, both for soil and water conservation and for our state parks,” said Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst. “We appreciate Governor Nixon’s support for renewal of this landmark program and encourage Missouri voters to renew it once again this November.”

“Missouri corn farmers have a long history of investing in our soil and natural resources,” said Morris Heitman, President of the Missouri Corn Growers Association. “The parks, soils and water effort extends an existing program that has proven itself valuable to agriculture and conservationists alike.”

“Missouri soybean farmers are firmly committed to ensuring the long term sustainability of our state's natural resources,” said Missouri Soybean Association President Matt McCrate of Cape Girardeau. “The parks, soils and water sales tax has had a key role in upholding that commitment. We’ve benefited from 30 years of successful partnership, bringing Missourians together on the common goal of ensuring the wise use of our natural resources, and we are committed to continuing that partnership moving forward.”

Missouri’s Parks, Soils and Water sales tax was created through a constitutional amendment specifically to support efforts to stop soil erosion and provide funding for the state park system. The tax was first approved by voters in 1984, and has since been reapproved by voters three times in 1988, 1996 and 2006.

Agriculture is Missouri’s number one industry. With nearly 100,000 family farms and 28 million acres of farmland, agriculture is a twelve billion dollar business in the Show-Me State, creating nearly 300,000 Missouri jobs.

Missouri’s Parks, Soils and Water sales tax provides funding for the Missouri Soil and Water Conservation Program, which assists farmers and landowners with soil and water conservation by providing partial reimbursement for a number management practices.

Since the tax was last renewed in 2006, more than 61,000 conservation practices have been implemented through $348 million in cost-share grant projects coordinated by Missouri’s local Soil and Water Conservation Districts. To date, more than 177 million tons of soil have been prevented from eroding into Missouri’s streams, rivers and lakes.

Missouri’s Parks, Soils and Water sales tax is also the primary source of funding for Missouri’s nationally acclaimed 88 state parks and historic sites.

The 2016 General Election will be held on Nov. 8, 2016.

Missourians who are not yet registered to vote can find registration information on the Missouri Secretary of State’s Website, www.sos.mo.gov.



Weather Forecast
Friday: Partly sunny, with a high near 77. Southeast wind 5 to 8 mph.
Saturday: A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 80.
Sunday: Sunny, with a high near 76.
Monday: Sunny, with a high near 80.
Tuesday: Sunny, with a high near 83.



Calendar of Events

June 8  Picnic in the park. Pavilion 2 across the whistle bridge. Time: 9:30 AM

June 11 & 12: Free Fishing Weekend

June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting

July 26th & 27th Moss cutting

August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting

October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting

Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society..
Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM

October 31st: End of Regular Season

November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017



Quote of the Week

Soon he was in the regular rhythm of it: cast-and-retrieve, step down, cast again. With each movement he felt more of the week's accumulated stress ease out of him, and his spirits rose accordingly.
Author:  Steve Raymond
Published:  Trout Quintet

Thanks for reading.
Lucy

Thursday, May 26, 2016

May 26, 2016

picture taken Thursday afternoon to show water conditions 5/26/16


How's Fishing?

The first question of the day has been "how's the water?"  I believe that many are concerned about the rain in the area and how it's affecting the fishing conditions.  The water is a bit murky in spots, but still very fish-able. Traditional lures such as black & yellow marabou and john deere mini jigs are doing well.   Not as many lunkers caught this week, but a good week for numbers of fish.
Moss cutting was done on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week.

  As we head into the weekend, it looks like several more days of occasional showers and temperatures in the low 80's. Beautiful for the Memorial Day Weekend.


Fishing Times
May                  6:30 a.m.      -   8:15 p.m.
June/July          6:30 a.m       -   8:30 p.m.
August             7:00 a.m.      -   8:00 p.m.
September       7:30 a.m.      -   7:15 p.m.
October            7:30 a.m       -   6:30 p.m.



Water Conditions

May 25, 2016 for Bennett Spring:

Gage house level is 2.06 feet
Daily Discharge levels:
All numbers are in Cubic Feet per Second
minimum was 82 in 1936
25th percentile is 143
current level is 150
Median is 211
Mean is 230
75th percentile is 302
Max was 500 in 1991



May 25, 2016 for Niangua River:

Gage House reading (water level) is 3.20 feet
Discharge levels in cubic feet per second:
Today's reading is 362
 minimum was 52 in 2012
25th percentile is 85
Median is 362
Mean is 413
75th percentile is 419
Max was 2050 in 1995

What's Working?
From the fly box
crane fly
san juan worm - white
Possum hair roach
crackleback: bennett blue, holographic green, pearl
scuds, orange or olive

Zone 1 or 2
peacock hurl mini jig
White floss
john deere mini jig
rooster tail: minnow, gold, bumble bee, brown glitter, or black with gold spinner
glo ball: original tri color, jimi hendrix
black & gold or brown woolie worm with spinner, olive wooly worm
Marabou - black, red & yellow, gingersnap, yellow & brown, shell & brown
white roach

Zone 3

rainbow power bait
salmon peach, yellow - power bait.
salmon eggs



Of Interest

I'm trying a new heading.    Let me know what you think about it.  Drop an email to weavers.fishingtales@gmail.com.  thanks!

It makes sense to start at the beginning, and the first question is obviously "what is a trout?" The trout found in Missouri are members of the salmonid family, and they act very similar to salmon. We have two primary species available in Missouri: the rainbow trout and the brown trout. There are some rumors floating around about some brook trout and even a few golden trout here and there, but these fish, if they exist, are well guarded in waters without public access. All Missouri trout are restricted to cold water locations where the water temperature doesn't generally move much above 75 degrees, even in the hottest part of the summer. Since the Southern half of Missouri is so rich with springs, there are numerous cold water rivers and streams that are perfect for these fish.

The Rainbow Trout is by far the most numerous trout found here. They were first introduced in Missouri's cold water streams in the 1880's. In fact, some of the earliest stockings were accomplished by railroad workers who dumped buckets of small trout into the streams the trains crossed. Some of these original strains of trout continue to exist to this day. Although there are several wild rainbow populations that can be found throughout the state, most of the decent-sized rainbow trout you'll find are hatchery raised. Hatchery trout spend 15 months or so eating about 1-1/4 pound of trout chow to grow to 11 inches or so before being stocked into trout streams throughout the state.

Rainbow trout, once they've lived wild for a while, will feed almost exclusively on aquatic insects (mayflies, caddis, midges, etc.), and terrestrial insects (ants, beetles, grasshopper, etc.). In some waters, the trout may feed largely on small crustaceans like scud (small freshwater shrimp) and sowbugs (aquatic "rolly pollies"). Even the largest rainbow trout will continue to feed on tiny bits of food with the occasional minnow, crayfish or sculpin thrown in, if it's a fairly easy target, but extra large rainbows may also become scavengers. This gives them the great amount of protein they need to maintain their size while allowing them to conserve energy. It also offers them some protection from fisherman. Recently released hatchery fish, however, will bite on any number of items (i.e. corn, marshmallows, dough bait, etc.), mainly because they were raised on lumps of food thrown at them. After stocking, it will take some time for them to experiment with natural food sources before they give up their preference for the hand-fed cafeteria style of feeding. It seems as though all trout, however, have some genetically imprinted desire to eat fish eggs. In virtually every trout stream, a good old fashioned "glo-bug" or the more new-fangled "glu-bug" can work wonders when nothing else will.

After literally decades of trial and error, two primary strains of rainbow trout are now grown in our hatcheries and stocked in our state. These two strains are called the "Missouri Strain" and the "Missouri Arlee Strain". Yep, our state actually developed it's own strains. Cool, eh? The whole point of playing mother nature was to develop a strain of fish that grew quickly, was resistant to disease, and resilient to changing water conditions. The reason for two strains is to have a strain that will spawn in the Autumn and another that will spawn in the Spring. This, of course, increases efficiency and yield from the hatcheries. All in all, they've devised a pretty neat system.

The brown trout is a different animal altogether, of course. Obviously it looks different, but it also behaves quite differently from the rainbow. These behaviors make the brownie a bit of an enigma.

The brown trout was first imported from Europe in the 1890's, according to many accounts. It was considered a good transplant for many areas, because it was able to tolerate water temperatures warmer than the smaller and slower-growing native brook trout. To this day, the brown trout is a very popular and sought-after fish. Part of the reason is that it is considered a more selective feeder, meaning it is a greater challenge to catch than its rainbow cousin. There are also fewer brown trout out there. The Missouri Department of Conservation raises between 1.5 and 2 million rainbow trout per year, but rarely more than 300,000 brown trout.

Yes, the brown trout feeds differently than the rainbow, but there is no study we're aware of that supports the supposition that browns are more selective. In fact, brown trout feed very much like rainbows until they reach about 12" in length and a pound in weight. Shortly thereafter, their diet begins to include more big stuff -- minnows, sculpins, crayfish, etc. -- and fewer bugs. This is simple nature. The reason? No one knows for sure, but there are a few theories which still need study. One is that they are simply more aggressive by nature. Another is that they need more protein per meal in order to meet their complex energy requirements. A third theory is more complicated, stating that browns may engage in seasonal gorging to bulk up on fat, thus allowing them to survive more dormant seasons like the coldest part of winter and the hottest part of summer. We'll leave the final decision to the biologists, but the result for fishermen is the same. Instead of picking at caddis larvae all day, a brownie will chase down a couple of sculpins or crayfish and be full for hours. They're not more selective -- they're just stuffed. They'll still bite, because they're opportunistic feeders, but you'll have to drift your bait to them just right. If they've recently fed, they certainly won't chase your fly or lure, unless it looks big and meaty and appears to be an exceptionally easy target.

Brown trout spawn in the fall and begin to gorge themselves prior to spawning. This pre-spawn buffet period generally begins in early October and can stretch into mid-November. It is during this period that true brown trout trophy hunters come out. And since brown trout also tend to be a lot more active at night than rainbows, those trophy hunters will often try their hand casting a big streamer or small crankbait at night in search of that 30+ pound monster hiding out there somewhere. The world record brown trout was caught in Arkansas and weighed roughly 40 pounds. Missouri will break that record eventually.



Lunker Club

5-15-16
Bob Worley from Wildwood, MO
2 pounds on a possum hair roach in zone 1

5-18-16
Caleb Crawford from Lawson, MO
4-3/4 pounds on a black & yellow marabou in zone 2

Caleb Crawford from Lawson, MO
2-1/4 pounds on a rainbow glo ball in zone 1

5-23-16
Paul Klausen from Blue Springs, MO
2-3/4 pounds on a salmon egg in zone 3

Greg Mallory from Overland Park IL
2 pounds on a chartreuse bead head in zone 1

5-22-16
Mark Lowrance from Lebanon, MO
3 pounds (c&r) on a dark olive marabou in zone 1

5-25-16
Gary Page from Maywood, MO
2-3/4 pounds on a black & white worm in zone 3



Fishing Times

May                6:30 a.m.                  -   8:15 p.m.
June/July       6:30 a.m.                  -   8:30 p.m.
August          7:00 a.m.                  -   8:00 p.m.
September  7:30 a.m.                  -   7:15 p.m.
October       7:30 a.m.                   -   6:30 p.m



Weather Forecast

Friday: Showers and thunderstorms likely. Cloudy, with a high near 76. South wind 11 to 16 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New rainfall amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.

Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 80.

Sunday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 84.

Memorial Day: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 82

Tuesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 80.

Wednesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 81.



Calendar of Events
June 8th: Picnic in the park. Pavillion 2 across the whistle bridge. Time: 9:30 AM
June 11 & 12: Free Fishing Weekend
June 11 (Saturday only): The Second Annual CFM Trout Fest
June 28th & 29th: Moss Cutting
July 26th & 27th Moss cutting
August 30th & 31st : Moss Cutting
October 4th & 5th : Moss Cutting
Saturday, October 8, 2016:
Holland Trout Derby, help raise some money for cancer society..
    Time: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM
October 31st: End of Regular Season
November 11, 2016: Start of Catch and Release for 2016 - 2017


Quote of the Week

It is the constant - or inconstant - change, the infinite variety in fly-fishing that binds us fast. It is impossible to grow weary of a sport that is never the same on any two days of the year.

Author:  Theodore Gordon
Published:  1914

Thanks for reading!  Lucy